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Writing for Comics and Graphic Novels with Peter David (Writing for Comics & Graphic Novels) PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

Writing for Comics and Graphic Novels with Peter David (Writing for Comics & Graphic Novels)

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Writing for Comics and Graphic Novels with Peter David (Writing for Comics & Graphic Novels) PDF, ePub eBook A must have for all comics, fantasy and sci-fi fans wanting to write their own comics or improve storytelling techniques, this revised edition focuses on comics, graphic novels and the updated market, particularly superhero and fantasy genres. Instruction is easy to follow, even for beginners. New content to the book includes ten brand-new pages of specific questions from A must have for all comics, fantasy and sci-fi fans wanting to write their own comics or improve storytelling techniques, this revised edition focuses on comics, graphic novels and the updated market, particularly superhero and fantasy genres. Instruction is easy to follow, even for beginners. New content to the book includes ten brand-new pages of specific questions from aspiring fans that read the first edition, covering a range of current and updated topics. Readers will also find useful a comprehensive chapter on the do's and don'ts of breaking into the comics business by Andy Schmidt, senior editor at "IDW", owner of a consulting company for aspiring comics professionals and author of "The Insider's Guide to Creating Comics and Graphic Novels". The revised edition also includes a brand-new introduction by Peter David as well as a new foreword by renowned comic's artist George Perez.

30 review for Writing for Comics and Graphic Novels with Peter David (Writing for Comics & Graphic Novels)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Wes Locher

    The author's name, Peter David, is almost synonymous with comic books. In addition to long runs on the X-Men, Spider-Man, and The Incredible Hulk, he's also worked on numerous DC titles and has written a ton of prose books. If there's one person that I would be more than happy to take writing advice from, it's Mr. David. The icing on the cake is that he spends 187 pages dishing on writing tips specific to the art of comic books. I've reviewed numerous books on writing for comics, but this was by The author's name, Peter David, is almost synonymous with comic books. In addition to long runs on the X-Men, Spider-Man, and The Incredible Hulk, he's also worked on numerous DC titles and has written a ton of prose books. If there's one person that I would be more than happy to take writing advice from, it's Mr. David. The icing on the cake is that he spends 187 pages dishing on writing tips specific to the art of comic books. I've reviewed numerous books on writing for comics, but this was by far my favorite. David goes in depth on inspiration for stories, characters and their motivations, themes, story structure, and scripting. Within all of these sections he offers up highly detailed insights and tips to help you succeed in the industry, or in your self-published comics project. As with any good book on writing, these suggestions are strictly geared toward comics, and can be applied to writing just about any type of character-driven epic you can imagine. To reinforce all of his ideas, Peter provides pages from existing comics -- sometimes entire sections so that you understand how sequential art plays into voicing your ideas. A comic book is made up of moments frozen in time and specific beats that move the story along. David provides one of the best sections on pacing in comics that I have read to date. Though you may not be familiar with all of the pages within this book (there are some odds and ends of lesser known titles) they are all prime examples of what he is preaching within the pages. Sprinkled in throughout the chapters are different exercises that the aspiring comic writer can use to hone and develop his or her skills. These should not be overlooked because it's his way of saying "If you can do this, you just might be able to succeed in the comics industry." Whereas some Comic Writing books take the most basic approach possible, Peter understands that you've probably read a few hundred comics in your day and have the basic understandings. He spends more time helping the reader think about their story, their characters, and the overall moral to the story that they are trying to tell. In addition to offering up typical writing advice, there are several appendices that detail tips for breaking into the industry as well as a section that addresses fan submitted questions. This book is currently in its second edition and is guaranteed to only get better in future releases. Pick up Peter David's Writing for Comics (or Graphic Novels, if you're afraid of the "C" word) and take your comic book aspirations to the next level.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tanis

    Really this should be titled "Writing for Superhero Comics". Also, it seems to be aimed at teenagers. Truth in advertising aside, it lays out basic narrative structure & character building in easy-to-follow explanations. Good if that's what you're looking for.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bill Coffin

    As a trade, writing suffers from appearing to be cooler than it really is, and as a result, there are many who look upon writing with romantic notions of it, and want to be a writer without really understanding what that means. Generally, this means that writers are sometimes met with folks who want to *be* a writer, even if they don't know how to write or don't even know how to begin. This what powers the entire publishing subset of writing how-to books, 99.999% of which the literary world can As a trade, writing suffers from appearing to be cooler than it really is, and as a result, there are many who look upon writing with romantic notions of it, and want to be a writer without really understanding what that means. Generally, this means that writers are sometimes met with folks who want to *be* a writer, even if they don't know how to write or don't even know how to begin. This what powers the entire publishing subset of writing how-to books, 99.999% of which the literary world can do without. Learning how to write is best done by writing, and by paying close attention to the things which inspire you. You learn by your mistakes, and by the practice of your craft. You can read a hundred books or websites about writing, but it's kind of like reading about sex. Would you rather learn about it by reading about it? Or would you rather learn about it by doing it, even if you're terrible at it at first? There are, however, exceptions to this, such as when you want to write something that requires a certain specific approach or formatting, such as screenwriting or writing graphic novels. And since I wish to begin writing graphic novels, I thought it would be wise to understand the formats and conventions of that before i began trying to turn out scripts my collaborating artist might not be able to make sense of. I picked up a few books on the subject, and Writing Comics & Graphic Novels with Peter David was the first one on the stack. Peter David is a renowned graphic novel writer, and presumably would be an ideal guy to write a book about the specifics of writing for a visual, rather than a literary, medium. I don't mean that as any kind of backhanded description: it is one thing to write a visually descriptive scene in a novel. It is quite another to write it for an artist to produce in a comic. And David, with his extensive bona fides in this regard, surely has the experience to describe how to go about this particular kind of storytelling. Unfortunately, most of this book is devoted to the most rudimentary things to consider when writing a story such as "what is a hero?" and "what is a villain?" and "what makes you care about the story?" Frankly, this is all stuff that is worthwhile only to the most beginner of beginners, and even then, I would imagine most people who buy this book are those who love comics, wish they could write one, and get this book hoping that it will unlock that need within them to sit down and put in the long hours that writing of any kind demands. The truth is, if you're going to start writing, you are going to just sit down one day and get at it, whether you know what you're doing or not. You don't need a book to show you the way, and yet, this book tries to do that for the majority of its length. As such, it comes off less as an earnest effort to explain the technical particulars of writing for the exacting standards of professional graphic novel publication, and more toward satisfying the perennial fan comment of "Man, I would love to write comics some day." So would we all.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chip'sBookBinge

    I love to write and have been doing as much as I can to learn from as many sources as possible. So, I decided to give Writing for Comics and Graphic Novels with Peter David a shot and see if there was anything new that I could pick up on. If anything, I like to see what other people's processes are, regarding how they approach writers block, getting ideas, format, etc... So, how was this book? Meh. It was okay. The thing about most writing books is that they all come from the same place: Aristotl I love to write and have been doing as much as I can to learn from as many sources as possible. So, I decided to give Writing for Comics and Graphic Novels with Peter David a shot and see if there was anything new that I could pick up on. If anything, I like to see what other people's processes are, regarding how they approach writers block, getting ideas, format, etc... So, how was this book? Meh. It was okay. The thing about most writing books is that they all come from the same place: Aristotle, who created the Beginning, Middle and End or the 3 Act structure. Everyone since then had tried to come up with their own variation. Some work, other don't. Overall, this book glosses over a lot of stuff. I really didn't find a whole lot of useful or new stuff that I didn't already know. The only interesting thing within' the book were the parts showing actual comic pages utilizing story and character structure. Other than that, there's not a lot going for it. You are better off finding books that go much deeper in theory and practical use then this one. It's an okay book. I just can't recommend this one at all. 3 Stars out of 5

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alan Carr

    I like Peter David's style and his candor, and reading this definitely helped inspire some ideas in my own creative works. That said, it does feel as though Peter David spent as little time as possible actually writing the book, putting down words and ideas on a page in a stream of consciousness style. The numerous comic book excerpts throughout the book are nice, but they take up too much of the volume of the actual book. Overall, I imagine this is a great read for a fan of Peter David's comic I like Peter David's style and his candor, and reading this definitely helped inspire some ideas in my own creative works. That said, it does feel as though Peter David spent as little time as possible actually writing the book, putting down words and ideas on a page in a stream of consciousness style. The numerous comic book excerpts throughout the book are nice, but they take up too much of the volume of the actual book. Overall, I imagine this is a great read for a fan of Peter David's comic work, but of only moderate use for an aspiring comic writer (and even less use for an aspiring graphic novel writer.)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anne Marshall

    Didn't finish

  7. 4 out of 5

    Warren Frey

    Excellent round up of what's needed to write comics. Got to meet the author by chance at Emerald City Comic Con and he was a total gentleman.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dustin

    A great book for writing.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    I read the earlier edition and really liked. I picked up this one at the Con and have been working my way through it. It has a slightly different slant on things which is good.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tone

    There's no bad information here. What David does better than most writers who write about writing is humility. He doesn't pretend that there's one way to do any of this.

  11. 5 out of 5

    E.W. Pierce

  12. 5 out of 5

    J.L. Metcalf

  13. 4 out of 5

    Antoinette

    Peter David writes like the wind. He has an exceptionally readable style no matter what he writes. The fact that his writing is so accessible can sometimes hide the fact that he's one of the cleverest and most erudite writers in the field. In this book, he distills complex ideas, brings in relevant examples, and entertains with personal anecdotes. Although this is an introductory book, I would welcome a more detailed and higher pitched book, because he seems to have much more to offer.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Robert Pannell

  16. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kate Kirby

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alice

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ian

  20. 5 out of 5

    Travis Heller

  21. 5 out of 5

    Saskia

  22. 5 out of 5

    Filip Różanek

  23. 4 out of 5

    John

  24. 4 out of 5

    Transvision Zack

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steven

  26. 4 out of 5

    Linda Brewster

  27. 5 out of 5

    Will O'mullane

  28. 4 out of 5

    Imran

  29. 5 out of 5

    Clint

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mmiddaugh

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