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The Philosophy of Horror PDF, ePub eBook

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30 review

The Philosophy of Horror

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The Philosophy of Horror PDF, ePub eBook Examining the evolving role of horror, this title investigates works such as Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), horror films of the 1930s, Stephen King's novels, Stanley Kubrick's adaptation of The Shining (1980), and Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960).

30 review for The Philosophy of Horror

  1. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    Very thought provoking, especially the essay comparing zombie social dynamics to Marxist theory

  2. 4 out of 5

    Frank Cernik

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. While generally an interesting and well-considered anthology, only two essays here concern me: ‘Through a Mirror, Darkly: Art-Horror as a Medium for Moral Reflection,’ by Philip Tallon, and ‘Shock Value: A Deleuzean Encounter with James Purdy’s Narrow Rooms,’ by Robert F. Gross. Tallon’s ‘Mirror’ expands a bit on Carroll’s Horror/Enlightenment speculation: in addition to violating cultural understandings of ‘Nature,’ Horror served as a moral warning against the Enlightenment’s veneration of reas While generally an interesting and well-considered anthology, only two essays here concern me: ‘Through a Mirror, Darkly: Art-Horror as a Medium for Moral Reflection,’ by Philip Tallon, and ‘Shock Value: A Deleuzean Encounter with James Purdy’s Narrow Rooms,’ by Robert F. Gross. Tallon’s ‘Mirror’ expands a bit on Carroll’s Horror/Enlightenment speculation: in addition to violating cultural understandings of ‘Nature,’ Horror served as a moral warning against the Enlightenment’s veneration of reason. According to Tallon, one of Horror’s lessons is that reason and its associated modes of intelligence, when uncoupled with a more restrictive and conservative kind of moral wisdom, can create new kinds of problems that we aren’t prepared to address. As such, Horror becomes a kind of complement to Hubris. As cultural values have shifted from the pursuit of rationality to an emphasis on relativism, though, Horror’s role has likewise shifted from antithesis to thesis: Horror attempts to create the kind of moral grounding that postmodernism would deny. For an evil to be compelling, it must be presented against shared values, and so Horror necessarily reinvigorates our senses of moral order. Taken together, these two modes of Horror mark it as a genre opposed to extreme viewpoints of both optimism (as expressed through hubris) and pessimism (in the form of absolute relativism). Gross’ ‘Shock Value’ is implicitly opposed to both Carroll and Tallon, inasmuch as it challenges the reductive assumptions of each, as marked by their respective kinds ‘interpretosis.’ In place of reductive interpretations and ‘molar’ beings, Gross explores Narrow Rooms as a ‘molecular’ site of complex multiplicities and anti-binary becomings. In the nature of his exploration is a resistance to cross application - there is not much in his close reading of the relationships in Narrow Rooms that could apply to those in The Babadook, for instance - but the method is no less exciting for that. This essay is something that I would very much enjoy using as a model. One of the things that I can take from this model, however, is the way that personal relationships in Narrow Rooms become more intense and affective through impersonal elements, and its treatment of the ways relationality is alternately enabled and foreclosed.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    This book suffers for having a weak connection to the series that applies philosophy to various aspects of pop culture. The first essays in this collection make rather tenuous connections to philosophy, whether it be Descartes or Hobbes. But in doing that, the analyses themselves suffer for being rather superficial and offering little more than what the movie itself is clearly already communicating. For example, applying Marxist theory to Land of the Dead. While the movie itself isn't necessaril This book suffers for having a weak connection to the series that applies philosophy to various aspects of pop culture. The first essays in this collection make rather tenuous connections to philosophy, whether it be Descartes or Hobbes. But in doing that, the analyses themselves suffer for being rather superficial and offering little more than what the movie itself is clearly already communicating. For example, applying Marxist theory to Land of the Dead. While the movie itself isn't necessarily applying Marx, the class issues already embedded into the movie are merely explained a bit further here, which in the end leaves the level of insight feeling rather thin. I prefer my criticism to unveil something more unconscious or surprising. The two essays I found quite worthwhile, thus saving the collection as a whole from one star, were Lorena Russell's essay about the representation of the nuclear family in the two versions of The Hills Have Eyes, and David MacGregor's Johnston essay on kitsch and camp.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steven Logan

    Partly boring, but definitely informative.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    The Philosophy of Horror presents some Great essays on the horror genre, forcing us to look at classic and contemporary masterpieces In new and dynamic ways. This is one of the best I've read from the philosophy of popular culture series of books.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alberto Boschini

  7. 4 out of 5

    E. Dade

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shan

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gracie

  10. 4 out of 5

    Candy_man666

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alana

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lousene

  13. 5 out of 5

    Decadent Sympozium

  14. 5 out of 5

    Crumpy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kimmy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Kurtzman

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kim Wong

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alex Tolbert

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Great collection that stirs and feeds my desire to teach a course about the relationship between religion/theology and horror.

  21. 5 out of 5

    idle nihilist

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mike Prosise

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brian Moloney

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jozefien

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shersta

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jane Poulsen

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mari Weaver

  28. 5 out of 5

    Pam Steers

  29. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Mullins

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

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