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Color: A Course in Mastering the Art of Mixing Colors PDF, ePub eBook

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Color: A Course in Mastering the Art of Mixing Colors

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Color: A Course in Mastering the Art of Mixing Colors PDF, ePub eBook Millions of people have learned to draw using the methods of Dr. Betty Edwards's bestseller The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. Now, much as artists progress from drawing to painting, Edwards moves from black-and-white into color. This much-awaited new guide distills the enormous existing knowledge about color theory into a practical method of working with colo Millions of people have learned to draw using the methods of Dr. Betty Edwards's bestseller The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. Now, much as artists progress from drawing to painting, Edwards moves from black-and-white into color. This much-awaited new guide distills the enormous existing knowledge about color theory into a practical method of working with color to produce harmonious combinations. Using techniques tested and honed in her five-day intensive color workshops, Edwards provides a basic understanding of how to see color, how to use it, and-for those involved in art, painting, or design-how to mix and combine hues. Including more than 125 color images and exercises that move from simple to challenging, this volume explains how to: see what is really there rather than what you "know" in your mind about colored objects perceive how light affects color, and how colors affect one another manipulate hue, value, and intensity of color and transform colors into their opposites balance color in still-life, landscape, figure, and portrait painting understand the psychology of color harmonize color in your surroundings While we recognize and treasure the beautiful use of color, reproducing what we see can be a challenge. Accessibly unweaving color's complexity, this must-have primer is destined to be an instant classic.

30 review for Color: A Course in Mastering the Art of Mixing Colors

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Though this book is now ten years old, it is invaluable for beginners who want a working knowledge of color. Edwards teaches us succinctly and clearly just enough theory and then puts a paint brush in our hands and provides a series of graduated exercises. Edwards bases her approach to color on brain science, specifically the observation that the brain longs for balance and creates after-images that are complements in hue, value, and intensity to the initial image. The exercises that she has desi Though this book is now ten years old, it is invaluable for beginners who want a working knowledge of color. Edwards teaches us succinctly and clearly just enough theory and then puts a paint brush in our hands and provides a series of graduated exercises. Edwards bases her approach to color on brain science, specifically the observation that the brain longs for balance and creates after-images that are complements in hue, value, and intensity to the initial image. The exercises that she has designed bring all of these concepts alive and embed them in consciousness. Edwards takes nothing for granted when she coaches. For example, she teaches that in pigments there is no true blue or true red. These two hues have trace chemicals that cause problems in mixtures with other pigments. As a result, painters need both a warm and a cool red as well as a warm and a cool blue. The first exercise that Edwards introduces is creating a color wheel (hue). Next, a value wheel and several intensity wheels help to sharpen understanding of the other two attributes of color. Then students move on to the major project that illustrates the themes that Edwards has developed. This project, Edwards writes, is “like a musical fugue with a theme that is stated and then restated with variations.” Having chosen a pleasing piece of fabric or wrapping paper, the student recreates it, first matching the colors used, then creating a section with the complements to the original colors, another section with opposite values, and a third section with opposite intensities, then repeating the original hues. Interestingly, several student projects have been bought right off the walls of California State University at Long Beach, a highly unusual happenstance, and something Edwards attributes to the balance achieved by this method. In the final chapters of the book Edwards takes on the problems of color constancy and simultaneous contrast. Both of these technical terms have to do with the difficulty the brain has in actually registering the color that the retina sees. She provides guidance and exercises in her trademark economy and clarity. She ends her book with a chapter on the symbolism of color.

  2. 5 out of 5

    James

    Update: I foolishly thought there may be shorter works on mixing and matching colors, looking at the books on color at some local libraries showed me how wrong I was. I've up the rating to a five, it's the best out there that I can find for now. Edwards has been teaching: drawing, painting, and other art topics for many decades. She found that students that did well in her color theory classes had a problem in mixing and using colors in their art. She totally revamped her color theory curriculum, Update: I foolishly thought there may be shorter works on mixing and matching colors, looking at the books on color at some local libraries showed me how wrong I was. I've up the rating to a five, it's the best out there that I can find for now. Edwards has been teaching: drawing, painting, and other art topics for many decades. She found that students that did well in her color theory classes had a problem in mixing and using colors in their art. She totally revamped her color theory curriculum, this book is the result of that work. Most of the exercises included do not require drawing skills, so anyone can pick up this book and get something useful from it. One key skill is the ability to see colors as values, the equivalent of mapping colors onto a gray scale, another is how colors affect the perception of other colors, and how habit play a role in how we perceive colors. She covers the traditional YRB color wheel with a side note that while CMYK is good for printers, decent pigments for implementing it doesn't currently exist. After covering some theory, the practice portion starts. A selection of paints, brushes and other items is laid out and the mixing and painting begins. Students wind up making their own color wheel that has several alterations to help analyze object colors. You also make wheels to show color intensity, along with mixing matching swatches. A bit of color harmony theory is added at the end. Next comes some simple still life instruction using folded color paper, the end goal of which is to select and mix the appropriate paints to match the colors of the paper model. A bit more difficult than it sounds, several painters tricks are discussed that can aid in accomplishing that goal. Finally, the student paints a floral still life, some drawing skill is required. The book wraps up with a bit of touchy-feely chapter on the meaning and symbolism of color, the author does warn you that this is a pretty subjective topic. Questions like what colors you like, dislike or associate with certain emotions are asked and I'm sure that it plays well in a classroom. If you master this material, you should be able to paint a picture that accurately represents the colors in any scene you care to reproduce. Also, this is an art book that you can read on a screen, all of the important color reproduction will be your work and not from the book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Informative overview of color theory as it relates to painting and mixing colors. My reason for reading it was to cultivate a better color-sense, not as much to learn to paint, so a lot of the instruction wasn't helpful to me. However, I'm still glad I read it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Domhnall

    Betty Edwards describes in detail the method she has used to teach art students how to paint. Just as her earlier book - Drawing with the Right Side of the Brain - was to some extent a training course in how to look at the world, this book is a serious training course in the understanding and appreciation of colour. In particular, she wants her students to develop the skill of identifying and naming the exact hues, shades, intensities of colour they encounter. Is the yellow of that daffodil to b Betty Edwards describes in detail the method she has used to teach art students how to paint. Just as her earlier book - Drawing with the Right Side of the Brain - was to some extent a training course in how to look at the world, this book is a serious training course in the understanding and appreciation of colour. In particular, she wants her students to develop the skill of identifying and naming the exact hues, shades, intensities of colour they encounter. Is the yellow of that daffodil to be made with a little added red, or a little added violet, or some black or some white or what? There are so many yellows the task seems too hard but with her aid I think I may have started to crack it. I say that I've read this book but it is not that type of book. After reading follows doing and I have approached the task without adhering to her strict requirements. There are practical obstacles, starting with the non availability of at least some of the colours she wants us to use. I can find them in oils but not acrylics. Instead I have cheerfully worked with the colours I do have. Maybe over time I will get closer to her exact instructions. What emerges is that colour theory makes far more sense when you set about doing stuff with paint. Other books I have tried provide lists of prescribed colour mixtures. This is the book I needed to start learning to work out my own colour mixes and also to understand why they have the effects they do have.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Makingamark

    This guide published in 2004 is by the bestselling author of Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. This is a primer for people wanting to learn more about colour written by an author who focuses on making art theory and practice accessible. Of all the books concerned with learning about colour it's probably most suitable for those who are just starting to learn about colour.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Patsy Parker

    This is the best book I have read on understanding color theory and how to mix colors. I refer back to it often even though I have been doing art for ten years. I highly recommend it!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mya

    Very informative, although a book that is probably only for beginners and introduction to colour theory. It probably deserves a reread, along with doing all the excercises mentioned.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ben Zimmerman

    I read Color because I had found Betty Edwards drawing book to be very helpful to improving my knowledge of art fundamentals. The major pros of this book are discussing the attributes of color (hue, value, and intensity) in practical ways that translate to technique in painting and by providing step by step instructions for how to proceed in painting, which is excellent for a novice like me. The major cons for me revolve around the presentation of the neuroscience behind color. First, I think tha I read Color because I had found Betty Edwards drawing book to be very helpful to improving my knowledge of art fundamentals. The major pros of this book are discussing the attributes of color (hue, value, and intensity) in practical ways that translate to technique in painting and by providing step by step instructions for how to proceed in painting, which is excellent for a novice like me. The major cons for me revolve around the presentation of the neuroscience behind color. First, I think that a more fundamental description of why certain colors are primary, why mixing certain colors dulls them, and how color perception works would benefit this book. Secondly, much of the neuroscience is presented in a way that is not totally correct. For instance, color constancy is sometimes presented as a result of semantic knowledge, rather than constancy of color under different illuminations. Finally, the author makes some appeals to studies of aesthetics and color harmony, but leaves this discussion very vague and unconvincing.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    I've found the information mostly elsewhere already in books I already have (good thing this is an inter library loan!). Text is a bit dense and my gut feeling is that I find James Gurney to be more helpful when it comes to things like color. My attention did catch at the value chapter, as that is something I struggle with; it's been a helpful feature in several other books I've read recently. As for the content of the book besides lots of text, there are twelve-ish simple projects in this book, I've found the information mostly elsewhere already in books I already have (good thing this is an inter library loan!). Text is a bit dense and my gut feeling is that I find James Gurney to be more helpful when it comes to things like color. My attention did catch at the value chapter, as that is something I struggle with; it's been a helpful feature in several other books I've read recently. As for the content of the book besides lots of text, there are twelve-ish simple projects in this book, with maybe four or five illustrations by the artist and a few samples from her students. There are also some historical paintings for reference. Overall, I found this to be on par with several DK art books I've read. It goes more in depth in the text, which is more college level, but the images and overall content don't really match the tone of the text, at least in my opinion. Maybe I'm just picky?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anderson Cubillos

    Great book for learning the basics of color. I read it to check again some concepts and other things that I had forgotten, and I did a couple of exercises. Important for beginners, it trains your eyes and teach you how to see the world from the color perspective

  11. 4 out of 5

    Àngela Maria

    Amazing knowledge, it has been very helpful.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Thejashwini Dev

    In reference to the previous book Drawing from right side of the brain, this book falls short in explaining color.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    I never thought there was so much to seeing color. Dr Edwards does a great job of explaining the complexities of color and helps deepen your artistic perception of them.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Annie Shay

    Gonna go back and paint. I'll buy the materials and do the exercises.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Curtis Seven

    I've just started to read this after getting a copy in the mail from half.com but I can already tell it is a pretty useful introductory work to the topic of color theory. One almost might have thought it a monograph due to the fact that it is a relatively compact work but the author while focusing on a specific topic does draw in references to a wider range of disciplines. Make no mistake it does not go into depth as to the physiological aspects or so called hard science research of human percep I've just started to read this after getting a copy in the mail from half.com but I can already tell it is a pretty useful introductory work to the topic of color theory. One almost might have thought it a monograph due to the fact that it is a relatively compact work but the author while focusing on a specific topic does draw in references to a wider range of disciplines. Make no mistake it does not go into depth as to the physiological aspects or so called hard science research of human perceptions of color or other sensory information this is a work as it relates to the process of creating and perceiving art. If you peruse her other titles you will no doubt see she has an excellent background and is familiar with Western Liberal Arts education at it relates here but it is not necessary to be an accomplished traditional penmen in order to progress to color theory with this book but it is a useful preface to moving from drawing to painting or adding more depth to your understanding of it. If you majored in another area as did I it is traditionally not uncommon to first focus on a mastery of drawing before painting. Partly this was at one time a practical matter in that turning pigments into paints and then making an image from them was a lot more costly and time consuming than it is now. Even as Industrialization introduced mass manufactured paints that were water soluble and packaged in tins (watercolor) and new oil based mediums available in tubes one still finds that Vincent Van Gogh for instance forced himself to master the art of drawing before painting. Van Gogh never studied art however as he was a theology student for what higher education he had but it is indicative of it as a practical matter and he no doubt had word of mouth to go by. Dr. Edwards takes an approach that acknowledges that to some extent todays world cannot imagine a setting where color is not omnipresent and as a result the book has been written on the assumption that many students interested in color theory may well have no background whatsoever in traditional media. Perhaps in a sense it also serves to simplify the text as the professor has previously covered the topics of drawing in greyscale and assorted systems in previous tomes thus making this a logical progression that still allows the traditional art student to follow the train of thought albeit by reading the other book(s). In the reviewers opinion even if you are looking at it out of interest say in graphic design where you are ultimately going to earn your keep with online and digital mediums it might serve you well to widen your horizons Dr. Edwards neatly written series. As of this writing (2011) one does see a convergence where the written, drawn, painted media going on. Witness the confluence of the graphic novel, comic book, video game, and film industries and the synergies they produce. Possessing the ability to work in traditional medias just basically serves to broaden your horizons and arguable further than ever in the history of such things. Even if ultimately you do find yourself replicating the experience in Painter, Artrage, Manga Studio, or some other commercial or custom application there will be basically no limit to how far you can build on the knowledge that had previously been handed down over centuries. It certainly wouldn't hurt anyways and as I noted like a monograph it is short but I'd argue it's really more an introductory work to a topic wide enough to occupy you a lifetime or several.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Erika Mulvenna

    A basic book on color theory written for art students. The author includes many hands on activities for learning about color with paints, and includes very basic instructions for readers with little to no experience painting. I think this would be a good book for anyone really interested in learning more about color in art.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    I am finally reading this wonderful book given to me by the author when I last saw her in 2005. Thanks to my friendship with her daughter, Anne, the three of us enjoyed a lovely lunch in the garden served up with stimulating conversation about art. This is the book I wish I had read when I was studying Art History at Uni. It explains so much about the concept of colour, the history of colour theory and most importantly how to determine the hue, value and intensity of a colour. I am reading Chapt I am finally reading this wonderful book given to me by the author when I last saw her in 2005. Thanks to my friendship with her daughter, Anne, the three of us enjoyed a lovely lunch in the garden served up with stimulating conversation about art. This is the book I wish I had read when I was studying Art History at Uni. It explains so much about the concept of colour, the history of colour theory and most importantly how to determine the hue, value and intensity of a colour. I am reading Chapter 4 about buying brushes in paints. I anticipate learning a great deal when i get to the chapters full of practical exercises in mixing colours.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Made me want to paint and try the exercises! Even learning that I also had the misconception that complementary colors don't infer that they at complimentary was valuable. While I may not become an art guru, understanding the lingo and behavior of colors better should help me later.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kip

    Some very useful insights in this book that I had never thought about. Though there seems to be a lot of disagreement between authors on how to think about colour relationships, which is itself interesting.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tina Rose

    I really enjoyed, as an art teacher, drawing on the right side of the brain. I don't think I learned as much from this book but it was still interesting. A nice book to have on hand in the classroom for reference.

  21. 4 out of 5

    LemontreeLime

    Should have read this ten years ago... this book is a life saver.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Kemp

    nice book, not what I was looking for tho

  23. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    Love to refer it again.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    Idk

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julie Smith

    Excellent book on the meaning behind colors. Highly recommend it for my peers who are pursuing art/play therapy certification.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Asmi Udassi

    Really very informative:)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Teri Temme

    Excellent book. I can't wait to do the exercises. I have always been fascinated with colors. Now I have a much greater understanding as to why.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Angela Roberts

    This book was exactly what I was looking for. Betty put into words what I naturally know how to do - this makes teaching a breeze. Color theory is way too important to not read this book!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    I'm treating this more like a reference book. I'm not reading it regularly.

  30. 4 out of 5

    stori .

    meh - better color book than some, not as good as others.

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