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Mrs. Dalloway / A Room of One's Own PDF, ePub eBook

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Mrs. Dalloway / A Room of One's Own

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Mrs. Dalloway / A Room of One's Own PDF, ePub eBook In Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf details Clarissa Dalloway’s preparations for a party of which she is to be hostess, exploring the hidden springs of thought and action in one day of a woman’s life. Paired here with A Room of One’s Own, a masterful and provocative essay on women’s role in society, this beautiful hardcover edition will be a welcome addition to the library of In Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf details Clarissa Dalloway’s preparations for a party of which she is to be hostess, exploring the hidden springs of thought and action in one day of a woman’s life. Paired here with A Room of One’s Own, a masterful and provocative essay on women’s role in society, this beautiful hardcover edition will be a welcome addition to the library of any Woolf scholar or fan.

30 review for Mrs. Dalloway / A Room of One's Own

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty

    Luminous, sparkling, enlightening, and unforgettable. Both of these works are seminal with regard to Woolf, and I cannot recommend them highly enough.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marla

    I barely liked it. I get talked into reading books by my girls, who are reading them for class. And I do love classics. So daughter #2 starts out with saying she has to watch the movie The Hours (based on Mrs. Dalloway) and compare it to the book. I'm pretty sure I'm the only one of the two of us that actually read the book and I'm completely certain that when daughter #2 was asking my opinion, she was looking for fodder for her paper. Mama ain't no fool. That being said, I feel for her. The book I barely liked it. I get talked into reading books by my girls, who are reading them for class. And I do love classics. So daughter #2 starts out with saying she has to watch the movie The Hours (based on Mrs. Dalloway) and compare it to the book. I'm pretty sure I'm the only one of the two of us that actually read the book and I'm completely certain that when daughter #2 was asking my opinion, she was looking for fodder for her paper. Mama ain't no fool. That being said, I feel for her. The book was dry and slow. It was very deep with many layers. On the surface, it's just about one day in the life of Mrs. Dalloway. But of course it's much more than that. A commentary on life and death, just a little light reading. Knowing a little of the life of Virginia Woolf...her ongoing depression, her eventual suicide...made the book that much more tragic. It was easy to see her mental illness in her writing. But, if this is your first foray into Virginia Woolf, I HIGHLY recommend doing this same exercise of watching The Hours and reading the book. The movie really does make the book all that much more fascinating and is really very good. She thinks she's going to talk me into James Joyce next. I've had a go at him at least a dozen times. No way. Not doing it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Leabelle

    Ahh.. to be one of the Bloomsbury set, writers with life experience and no need of a paying job. Both these novels are worth reading, Woolf brings life to Dalloway as a soul hovering between worlds but constrained by her place in English society. In Room of One's own, her classic autobiographical essay, she brings insight to herself as a writer, the moods of her illness as she portends its final dramatic conclusion, art in her case preceding life. The many challenges she faced as a woman writer Ahh.. to be one of the Bloomsbury set, writers with life experience and no need of a paying job. Both these novels are worth reading, Woolf brings life to Dalloway as a soul hovering between worlds but constrained by her place in English society. In Room of One's own, her classic autobiographical essay, she brings insight to herself as a writer, the moods of her illness as she portends its final dramatic conclusion, art in her case preceding life. The many challenges she faced as a woman writer of her era (there were many women writers, including her good friends in her time - at least Britain and Europe had progressed past the point of having to use a male pen name by the time Woolf wrote her books even if she did have to be accompanied by a male to enter the university library). While she could never be described as the one of the great English novelists, she was a very good writer, superb in her own way.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    i haven't read mrs. dalloway yet, i tried and i just couldn't do it, but i did read and really enjoy a room of ones own, i heard that it was a good place to start and ease into her writing style and i'd agree with that statement bc although most of it was stream of consciousness it was much more structured than i've found mrs. dalloway (in the few pages i read of it), i'm feeling a little discouraged about mrs. dalloway but my brain just can't follow it right now and i'm only a few pages in so i i haven't read mrs. dalloway yet, i tried and i just couldn't do it, but i did read and really enjoy a room of ones own, i heard that it was a good place to start and ease into her writing style and i'd agree with that statement bc although most of it was stream of consciousness it was much more structured than i've found mrs. dalloway (in the few pages i read of it), i'm feeling a little discouraged about mrs. dalloway but my brain just can't follow it right now and i'm only a few pages in so i'm going to move one to something else, maybe i'll come back to it later when the time is right and love it, i hope i will

  5. 4 out of 5

    J.M. Johnson

    I've already read Mrs. Dalloway a few times, and I believe I will always find something new with each read. Woolf never comes out and tells us things, she leaves it up to the readers to grasp their own meaning. She trusts our intelligence enough that we'll find answers. This book takes place over the course of one day and within this day, Woolf is able to tell us so much about her characters and about the human existence. A Room of One's Own - A must read if you want to begin to understand Virgi I've already read Mrs. Dalloway a few times, and I believe I will always find something new with each read. Woolf never comes out and tells us things, she leaves it up to the readers to grasp their own meaning. She trusts our intelligence enough that we'll find answers. This book takes place over the course of one day and within this day, Woolf is able to tell us so much about her characters and about the human existence. A Room of One's Own - A must read if you want to begin to understand Virginia Woolf. I'm not sure I would enjoy reading this if I were a man, but I feel that ever woman writer should read this.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tippy Jackson

    I read this one backwards- I started with A Room of One's Own because the Diversity in all forms group was reading it. I wanted to stop and take notes from this one before reading Mrs. Dalloway. So far so great! I loved this essay. Here are a few of my favorite gems: "Thought-to call it by a prouder name that it deserved- had let its line down into the stream. It swayed, minute after minute, hither and thither among the reflections and the weeds, letting the water lift it and sink it, until- you k I read this one backwards- I started with A Room of One's Own because the Diversity in all forms group was reading it. I wanted to stop and take notes from this one before reading Mrs. Dalloway. So far so great! I loved this essay. Here are a few of my favorite gems: "Thought-to call it by a prouder name that it deserved- had let its line down into the stream. It swayed, minute after minute, hither and thither among the reflections and the weeds, letting the water lift it and sink it, until- you know the little tug-the sudden conglomeration of an idea at the end of one's line: and then the cautious hauling of it in, and the careful laying of it out? Alas, laid in the grass how small, how insignificant this thought of mind looked; the sort of fish that a good fisherman puts back in the water so that it may grow fatter and one day be worth cooking and eating...But however small it was, it had, nevertheless, the mysterious property of its kind-put back into the mind, it became at once very exciting, and important; and as it darted and sank and flashed hither and thither, set up such a wash and tumult of ideas that it was impossible to sit still." "No force in the world can take from me my five hundred pounds. Food, house, and clothing are mine for ever. Therefore not merely do effort and labour cease, but also hatred and bitterness. I need not hate any man; he cannot hurt me. I need not flatter any man; he has nothing to give me." After reading sections on the position of women in the History of England: "Not being a historian, one might go even further and say that women have burnt like beacons in all the works of all the poets from the beginning of time-Clytemnestra, Antigone, Cleopatra, Lady Macbeth, Phedre, Cressida, Rosalind, Desdemona, the Duchess of Malfi, among the dramatists; then among the prose writers: Millamant, Clarissa, Becky Sharp, Anna Karenina, Emma Bovary, Madame de Guermantes-the name flock to mind, nor do they recall women "lacking in personality of character." Indeed if woman had no existence save in the fiction written by men, one would imagine her a person of the utmost importance; very various, heroic and mean; splendid and sordid; infinitely beautiful and hideous in the extreme; as great as a man, some think even greater. But this is woman in fiction. In fact, as Professor Trevelyan points out, she was locked up, beaten and flung about the room. A very queer, composite being thus emerges. Imaginatively she is of the highest importance; practically she is insignificant. She pervades poetry from cover to cover; she is all but absent from history. She dominates the lives of kings and conquerors in fiction; in fact she was the slave of any boy whose parents forced a ring upon her finger. Some of the most inspired words, some of the most profound thoughts in literature fall from her lips; in real life she could hardly read, could scarcely spell and was the property of her husband... History scarcely mentions her. And I turned to Professor Trevelyan again to see what history meant to him. I found by looking at his chapter headings that it meant - 'The Manor Court and the Methods of Open-field Agriculture... The Cistercians and Sheep-farming... The Crusades...The University...The House of Commons...The Hundred Years' War... The War of the Roses...The Renaissance Scholars...The Dissolution of the Monasteries...Agrarian and Religious Strife...The Origin of English Seapower...The Armada...' and so on. Occasionally an individual woman is mentioned, an Elizabeth, or a Mary; a queen or a great lady. But by no possible means could middle-class women with nothing but brains and character at their command have taken part in any of the great movements of which, brought together, constitute the historian's view of the past." "Suppose for instance, that men were only represented in literature as the lovers of women, and were never the friends of men, soldiers, thinkers, dreamers; how few parts in the plays of Shakespeare could be allotted them; how literature would suffer! We might perhaps have most of Othello; and a good deal of Antony, but no Caesar, no Brutus, no Hamlet, no Lear, no Jaques-literature would be incredibly impoverished, as indeed literature is impoverished beyond our counting by the doors that have been shut upon women." Personally, I loved learning about the context in which early female authors had to write. Jane Austen hid her work whenever someone walked in the room. I'm a little disappointed that this context wasn't discussed in my high school when we read some of her books. To be honest, I never really thought about early female writers and what it must have been like for them. I'm happy to rectify that :-) I also liked how she used the idea of Shakespeare's sister to illustrate her point and round out her discussion. So I started Mrs. Dalloway and found that I wasn't really enjoying it. I loved A Room of One's Own, but not this story. As our group was only reading A Room of One's Own I decided to move on to other books.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Note that I only read A Room of One's Own (NOT Mrs. Dalloway) but I had to force myself to trudge through it. And by the end, I didn't really feel I had gained anything. It was a unique, partially fictionally, look at women authors and the lack thereof. She made some valid points about why there weren't women authors in the 19th and early 20th centuries, but I felt it took sitting through a lot of tangents to get to those points. And mixing fictional authors with real ones was sometimes distract Note that I only read A Room of One's Own (NOT Mrs. Dalloway) but I had to force myself to trudge through it. And by the end, I didn't really feel I had gained anything. It was a unique, partially fictionally, look at women authors and the lack thereof. She made some valid points about why there weren't women authors in the 19th and early 20th centuries, but I felt it took sitting through a lot of tangents to get to those points. And mixing fictional authors with real ones was sometimes distracting. Maybe someone who has a greater appreciation for essays would appreciate this more, but it's not my cuppa.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    I do not remember the last time I gave up on a book. Usually I keep plowing through it, and something does spark my interest. As I tried to get through this one, with its endless sentences that make up one gigantic paragraph after another, I kept saying keep going, keep going, it's got to get better. Halfway through I gave up. There are too many truly enjoyable books to read instead of drudging through this one. Sorry, I tried.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    For my first time reading Woolf, I was incredibly disappointed. Mrs. Dalloway might be inventive in its structure, but it involves the same boring upper class people and their social lives that so many novels have covered already. A Room of One's Own is notable for its thesis that female cultural production is dependant on financial resources, but as much as the position is understandable for its time, I hated the insistence on the supreme genius of Shakespeare and the viewpoint that art that in For my first time reading Woolf, I was incredibly disappointed. Mrs. Dalloway might be inventive in its structure, but it involves the same boring upper class people and their social lives that so many novels have covered already. A Room of One's Own is notable for its thesis that female cultural production is dependant on financial resources, but as much as the position is understandable for its time, I hated the insistence on the supreme genius of Shakespeare and the viewpoint that art that involves anger or political commentary is impure. I found it ironic that Woolf talks about the wider range of social material available to writers (so not just upler class people), but her focus for what is art is so narrow and explicitly ties cultural production to those who have means. It's true even now that it's almost a necessity to have the independent income to be an artist without starving, but there's more to art than thedetached consideration of social relations at parties.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I did not like this novel. It was used for one of my writing classes and I just couldn't get into the novel. I wasn't impressed with the writing style or the main character...actually, I didn't like any of the characters, for that matter. I know some people who absolutely adore Woolf's writing style, but I'm not one of them. It was interesting to hear my classmates discuss the imagery and descriptions throughout the novel, but I just didn't like it. Nope, definitely not a fan. *Taken from my book I did not like this novel. It was used for one of my writing classes and I just couldn't get into the novel. I wasn't impressed with the writing style or the main character...actually, I didn't like any of the characters, for that matter. I know some people who absolutely adore Woolf's writing style, but I'm not one of them. It was interesting to hear my classmates discuss the imagery and descriptions throughout the novel, but I just didn't like it. Nope, definitely not a fan. *Taken from my book reviews blog: http://reviewsatmse.blogspot.com/2011...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Clough

    I wish I could say I loved it--I really wanted to--but I didn't. At times it was maddening because I would read twenty pages and all that happened was Mrs. Dalloway walked to the flower market and thought about something. It wasn't terrible and I am fascinated with Woolf's life so I am praying her other works are more entertaining.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia Sarno

    I read A Room of One's Own in college and it made a big impression on me. I highly recommend it for women who want to write. Mrs. Dalloway likewise is memorable - visual with great characterization. Mrs. Dalloway herself is hard to forget.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Koppelkam

    There's really no review of "A Room of One's Own" that can say something this foundational essay/lecture doesn't say. Whenever I read Woolf, I am shocked by how contemporary her criticism feels, and by how deeply hilarious she is. Woolf = queen of the dry, sarcastic roast.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kari Ni

    I should read it again.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Talyah

    I'm only here for "a room of ones own"

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charmaine Vannimwegen

    Loved it! Every woman should read this book. It's acerbic at times, witty most of the time, and just an entertaining discussion about a woman's place in literature and education in general.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cassie

    I'm calling it chick lit, even though it predates the genre, lol! I'd love to have a room of mine own, but with texting and facebook, I still probably wouldn't be able to write a novel. :)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tatia

    It begins well and then I got lost... I was a little bored and a little disappointed by the middle of the book. I chose 3 stars because it gave me some thoughts to reflect on though.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kristi Rojas

  20. 4 out of 5

    Athina Fransson

  21. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Luneau

  22. 4 out of 5

    Laura Scott

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ieva Sabaliauskaitė

  24. 5 out of 5

    Candace Shoemaker

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kim Forsythe

  26. 4 out of 5

    Zeze

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  28. 5 out of 5

    Greg Sewitz

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  30. 5 out of 5

    John Madera

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