Hot Best Seller

Chess: 5334 Problems, Combinations and Games PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

Chess: 5334 Problems, Combinations and Games

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: Chess: 5334 Problems, Combinations and Games .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


Chess: 5334 Problems, Combinations and Games PDF, ePub eBook Here is the most complete collection of chess problems ever published, including 5,334 instructional situations, presented by the world's leading chess teacher. Chess analyzes more than 5,000 unique instructional situations, many taken from real matches, including 306 problems for checkmate in one move, 3,412 mates in two moves, 744 mates in three moves, 600 miniature game Here is the most complete collection of chess problems ever published, including 5,334 instructional situations, presented by the world's leading chess teacher. Chess analyzes more than 5,000 unique instructional situations, many taken from real matches, including 306 problems for checkmate in one move, 3,412 mates in two moves, 744 mates in three moves, 600 miniature games, 144 simple endgames, and 128 tournament game combinations. Chapters are organized by problem type. Each problem, combination, and game is keyed to an easy-to-follow solution at the back of the book, so readers can learn as they go. More than 6,000 illustrations make it easy to see the possibilities any position may hold. The book also includes the basic rules of the game and an international bibliography. Chess is the ultimate book on winning the game.

30 review for Chess: 5334 Problems, Combinations and Games

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maritess

    This is a KICK ASS BOOK that everyone should own from unrated players to Chess Masters. It is especially extraordinary because there are no words, only pictures, lots of fun looking at the combinations because it's very visual, and you can look at it at your own pace. Ah, memories. Let's just say you haven't lived until you've beaten a chess master and then had your ass kicked by a 3rd grader. I'll always remember her last words before she killed me, "Wait Dad, I'm almost done." grr.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    This book is a must have for any player trying to increase his level of play. Though basically it's 1/4 mate in one puzzles, 2/4 mate in two puzzles, and 1/4 combination it is still a great book (many of the books that are mainly exercises, have positional puzzles, defense puzzles, forks/skewers/discover puzzles, and piece value/trade puzzles). I have not completely finished all of the puzzles within, but I have done all of the mate in ones, all of the mate in twos, but only about 1/4 of the com This book is a must have for any player trying to increase his level of play. Though basically it's 1/4 mate in one puzzles, 2/4 mate in two puzzles, and 1/4 combination it is still a great book (many of the books that are mainly exercises, have positional puzzles, defense puzzles, forks/skewers/discover puzzles, and piece value/trade puzzles). I have not completely finished all of the puzzles within, but I have done all of the mate in ones, all of the mate in twos, but only about 1/4 of the combinations. Im still working at it. Again this is a must have weapon in your chess arsenal.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Another daily devotional thanks to smartphone tech. Problems of every variety and with the intention of drilling past mastery. Which is why it often is accused of being a little monotonous in problem selections. Polgar was aiming to instill secondhand reflex. Will probably take ~4yrs to work through.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Serge Pierro

    Literally thousands upon thousands of problems to solve. A great one volume collection of tactical studies. There are better books on the market for studying tactics, however there is nothing that matches it in sheer numbers. Sidenote: some of the problems are composed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Daahoud Asante

    THIS IS THE DEFINITIVE CHESS PUZZLE BOOK...I DO 3 OR 4 EVERY MORNING LIKE CLOCKWORK, MY CHESS HAS IMPROVED BECAUSE OF IT, BUY A SMALL ANALYSIS SET AND GET TO MATING!!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    a giant book of chess problems (limited/no text). good fun. and perfect for the under 5 set, since you don't need to read to enjoy it!

  7. 4 out of 5

    IWB

    This book, the "bible of tactics," is the best bang for your training bucks. You can easily pick up a used copy of this for around $9--do it. The publisher description is good but let me elaborate a bit on a few things. Firstly, there are no explanations for any of the problems, combos, or games; in fact, if I recall, the only actual sentences that occur, other than Laszlo's forward and Pandolfini's intro, are brief remarks about the rules of the game and the properties of the pieces. So, while This book, the "bible of tactics," is the best bang for your training bucks. You can easily pick up a used copy of this for around $9--do it. The publisher description is good but let me elaborate a bit on a few things. Firstly, there are no explanations for any of the problems, combos, or games; in fact, if I recall, the only actual sentences that occur, other than Laszlo's forward and Pandolfini's intro, are brief remarks about the rules of the game and the properties of the pieces. So, while a total beginner can learn to play chess from this book, this is not a beginner's course book--this book would supplement such a course. Because there are no explanations, one cannot get a deep understanding of why some of the tactics work as they do, or why certain moves in the miniatures occurred. The closest thing to an explanation in the games is the occasional Informant-style annotation variation of a few moves. (Informant annotations are symbolic annotations not ordinary language annotations.) Secondly, there is a section of simple endgames--144 diagrams, I think, of which some are far more important to know than others; and by " important to know" I mean some are theoretical endgames that must be memorized and whose winning and drawing methods learned by heart. Such important theoretical endgames need explanation because just knowing the pattern is not sufficient at certain levels. Sure, knowing the pattern for winning a K+P v K endgame, for example, is good but without understanding the concepts of the various sorts of opposition, key control squares, and outflanking, one will fumble in all but the most elementary scenarios. Regardless, these simple endgame positions are worth going over again and again and again. Thirdly, the miniature games (25 moves or fewer) are organized by tactical focal point; i.e., the focus of the tactic is on the f2/f7 square, the g3/g6 square, h2/h7, f3/f6, h3/h6, etc. This is very useful for quickly developing pattern recognition--and that's really what this book is good for: building a memory bank of tactical patterns. If you are rated under 1800 you should be devouring this material, and not just once. Just do the work, the good chess will eventually follow. Here are two personal stories about this book that you might find helpful or interesting. A few years ago a family, who knew virtually nothing about chess, except that they wanted their little girl to be the next Humpty Koneru, contacted me about coaching their 6 year old daughter. They had mentioned that previously she had been studying with a certain IM but that they thought he was not a good fit. Okay, so I meet with the family and the kid and find out that the only study material the IM had provided (other than the weekly one hour in-person meeting) was this Polgar book, and it was the hardcover edition, to boot. The hardcover, I believe, is what the young 4 year old Capablanca sat on to see the board when he was beating up on his father in that 1892 photo. I mean, this 6 year old girl was barely bigger than the book. You don't hand a monstrosity like this to a 6 year old and expect them to start using it for their own edification. (This kind of thoughtless, I'm-collecting-an-easy-paycheck approach to coaching is, unfortunately, far more common than you might think among titled players who have to coach.) In 2017 I had the opportunity to meet Susan Polgar (one of Laszlo's prodigy daughters) and discuss training materials with her. One thing she said to me about this book by her father is that it consists of some of the type of training material her father used for training her and Judit and Sofia, but that she didn't necessarily think it was organized as well as it could be; hence, the Susan Polgar series Learn Chess The Right Way, which she thinks is a better approach to chess pedagogy. One final thought about a couple of criticisms of this book that are either just empirically false, misguided, or the sort of stuff the lazy repeat mindlessly. Some complain that this book is all checkmates and thus is not all that helpful, especially with other kinds of tactics. Presumably they mean tactics culminating in the gain of some material (or possibly some abstract key positional goal, like control of a key square or file, or creating a passer; or causing some static weakness in the opponent’s camp like “Irish Pawns”, castling prevention, and so forth ). This is false. Most of the positions culminate in mate but a good number of the simple endgames end in draws and a winning significant advantage for one side; furthermore, a number of the combos from the Polgar sisters’ games do not end in mate but advantage to one side. Those with this complaint must have mastered all the mates and can solve all these problems in 3 seconds or fewer with no problems, right? I mean, that’s why they are complaining because they need to move on to winning a pawn after 4 moves, because they have just mastered all these mate patterns, right? Some complain that this book is not so great because some of the diagrams are artificially constructed mates. The idea here is that because the position is not from a real over-the-board game that the position has no practical value to players. Very few strong players would agree with this assessment and instead attest to real practical value in studying compositions. Let’s consider this: take, say, 50 of Gioachino Greco’s games. He has these great games in the King’s Gambit, Latvian Gambit, Italian, Vienna, 2 Knights, etc., that have foundational tactics and combos. They are exciting and highly instructive games featuring rudimentary and (now) ubiquitous tactical themes, like exchange sacs, queens checking on the Fool’s Diagonal, the so-called Greco Mate, back rank mates, skewers, pins, and the ever so cool Greek Gift sac. Make diagrams of the tactical shots and solve them. Evidence shows that it is highly likely that most or all of Greco’s games that have survived up to now are constructions, artificial creations. Are you telling me that these have no practical value for regular players? Every GM and IM I’ve ever worked with have all studied compositions and all think it improved their practical game. Studying regular tactics develops pattern recognition and some calculation, but compositions further improve one’s calculation and visualization. Here’s a quote from GM Daniel Naroditsky’s Chess.com article Why Solving Studies is so Important: “Many years ago, my coach introduced me to this titan of composing [Kasparian] by showing me one of his most famous creations. On that day, my passion for studies was born. Looking back, I can proudly say that all of the hours I spent poring over study collections were not in vain. By regularly solving studies, I considerably enhanced three crucial aspects of my tactical ability: visualization, awareness, and imagination. To be sure, composers have as their primary intent the pursuit of aesthetic excellence. However, as we are about to see, aesthetics and instructional value are directly proportional!” These attributes are obviously important to better practical play. Here is another quote: “Most players have an uneasy feeling about composed studies. They don’t like those ‘White to play-and-win’ positions they see in magazines because they seem artificial. Yes, most studies are artificial. But what amateurs might like about them is that the solution is usually 100 percent tactical. You don’t have to know esoteric, technical positions. Just work out the tactics. In fact, one of the best ways to improve your winning technique is to work on endgame tactics.” (GM Andrew Soltis – “What it Takes to Become a Chess Master”) and another: “What it may lose in realism is more than compensated by the fact that it is uncluttered by inessential detail … giving it a permanent abstract clarity which can only prove an aid to logical thinking and retention in memory. (John Littlewood - “Chess Coaching”) oops, another one is here: “For those not convinced by the empirical evidence, there are several plausible reasons why looking at chess problems and studies will improve your chess…Firstly it should enhance powers of chess fantasy by building up the ‘vocabulary’ of tactical ideas and patterns…Secondly, solving problems and studies require very clear, logical, precise, goal-orientated thinking…Thirdly, and perhaps most importantly, there is the question of motivation…(which) is critical to competitive success.” (GM Jonathan Levitt and IM David Friedgood - “Secrets of Spectacular Chess”) blue face visage--from Kasparov: “I am fond of solving chess problems and, particularly, chess studies. The time I take to solve studies tests my sporting form and I use many ideas in practical play.” (again from “Secrets of Spectacular Chess”) and the beaten dead horse: "Richard Reti’s definition of endgame studies was: ‘Endgame studies are endgame positions with extraordinary content.’” (GM Jan Timman – foreword from Mark Dvoretsky’s “Studies for Practical Players”) 'Nuff said.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    The description is wrong. This book has nothing to do with Grandmaster Maurice Ashley. CHESS is a book written (assembled?) by Laszlo Polgar and contains many puzzles and game fragments. Most of the puzzles are checkmate in two or three moves. Laszlo is the father of the famous Polgar sisters.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    I made it to problem 700 before returning this book to the library. I won't deny that it is excellent practice, but I have two main complaints. First, the book is only checkmates and gives little assistance on other kinds of tactics. Second, many of the positions are composed rather than coming from actual games. This reduces the transferability of the practice to actual play.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stuart Woolf

    This book is fantastic, so far my favorite on chess. It is easily the shortest 1,000 page book I've ever read, in terms of number of words. The bulk of the book is comprised of board layouts, with roughly eight games per page; the illustrations are very useful, an enormous improvement over Silman (who makes heavy use of chess notation in numbered, paragraph form. Really, Silman is a pain to read.) Most of the problems contained in this book are endgame-oriented, like mates in one, two or three mo This book is fantastic, so far my favorite on chess. It is easily the shortest 1,000 page book I've ever read, in terms of number of words. The bulk of the book is comprised of board layouts, with roughly eight games per page; the illustrations are very useful, an enormous improvement over Silman (who makes heavy use of chess notation in numbered, paragraph form. Really, Silman is a pain to read.) Most of the problems contained in this book are endgame-oriented, like mates in one, two or three moves. The purpose of the book is to get you to recognize patterns unthinkingly; it is very effective. I love it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    LostKnight

    This is a GREAT puzzle book for chess players. This book is easy to read and understand. Make sure you have your chess set handy for these puzzles. Highly recommended especially for beginning chess players.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Raymond

    Most instructive book I've read about chess.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Hill

    Fantastic.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Usfromdk

    Solved two thousand problems or so, then lost the ambition to finish the book/got bored/got sidetracked and never returned to it. Currently my thinking is that solving problems like the ones you'll encounter on sites like Chesstempo is at least as useful as is solving problems like the ones included in this book, and so I doubt I shall ever actually return to it. Working systematically on the problems included in this book will in my opinion definitely help your ability to calculate lines and ev Solved two thousand problems or so, then lost the ambition to finish the book/got bored/got sidetracked and never returned to it. Currently my thinking is that solving problems like the ones you'll encounter on sites like Chesstempo is at least as useful as is solving problems like the ones included in this book, and so I doubt I shall ever actually return to it. Working systematically on the problems included in this book will in my opinion definitely help your ability to calculate lines and evaluate positions, but there are lots of other ways to improve these skills as well so the book is hardly a 'must-read' in the way that e.g. Jesús de la Villa's endgame book might be argued to be.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Khoo

    It is the perfect book for those who plays chess a lot. It has different types of techniques of how to force the opponent to move or trap them. By reading this book, you get some knowledge and also the discipline of the timing and the way of how a tactician thinks in chess as well as a person in real life. I recommend everyone this book to read because it gives you the way of solving every type of puzzles.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael Nabil

    very good book in end games

  17. 5 out of 5

    Doron Yam

    A nice book with problems, arranged by method and difficulty. There are more of it in chess literatue, not special...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rob Haas

    Its pretty thick and looks intimidating on your shelf when your friends come over for a game.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark Dunn

    I will never actually finish this book until I can do 70% of the puzzles. I would probably have to go through the book a dozen times.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Push-ups for Chess players. Übung macht den Meister!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy W

    The initial copy was like 14"x 17" x 5", quite the coffee table-doorstop-paperweight-anvil. The latest one is a much more manageable roughly 6x10x4. Read should be read as -partially solved.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jr.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Hübner

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  25. 5 out of 5

    zoe nicol

  26. 5 out of 5

    S.A. Alenthony

  27. 4 out of 5

    Asdfking

  28. 4 out of 5

    Autumn

  29. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Kahn

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dimitris Sotiropoulos

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.