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Antrax

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Antrax PDF, ePub eBook Brave explorers led by the last Druid, Walker Boh, traveled across unknown seas in search of an elusive magic. But now it seems that Walker and his team were lured there for sinister, unforeseen purposes. As the crew aboard the airship Jerle Shannara is being attacked by evil forces, the Druid's protege, Bek Rowe, and his companions are being pursued by the mysterious Ilse Brave explorers led by the last Druid, Walker Boh, traveled across unknown seas in search of an elusive magic. But now it seems that Walker and his team were lured there for sinister, unforeseen purposes. As the crew aboard the airship Jerle Shannara is being attacked by evil forces, the Druid's protege, Bek Rowe, and his companions are being pursued by the mysterious Ilse Witch. Meanwhile, Walker is alone, caught in a dark maze beneath the ruined city of Castledown, stalked by a hungry, unseen enemy. It is alive, but not human, coveting the magic of Druids, elves, even the Ilse Witch. It hunts men for its own designs. It is Antrax: a spirit that feeds off enchantment and traps the souls of men. And with it, the fate of the Four Lands hangs in the balance.

30 review for Antrax

  1. 4 out of 5

    Markus

    Across fathomless seas, beyond the far horizon, the voyagers aboard the Jerle Shannara face the deadliest - and darkest - challenge of their lives. The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara trilogy takes a new direction with its second book. Whereas Ilse Witch was an epic tale of adventure, Antrax is a story of a band of lost voyagers trapped on a mysterious peninsula where countless horrors await. This is where the new world of Shannara faces what is left of the old. Magic meets science while the crew of Across fathomless seas, beyond the far horizon, the voyagers aboard the Jerle Shannara face the deadliest - and darkest - challenge of their lives. The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara trilogy takes a new direction with its second book. Whereas Ilse Witch was an epic tale of adventure, Antrax is a story of a band of lost voyagers trapped on a mysterious peninsula where countless horrors await. This is where the new world of Shannara faces what is left of the old. Magic meets science while the crew of the Jerle Shannara struggles desperately for survival. I liked Antrax. But out of so many good novels in the Shannara series, this is simply not one of the best in my opinion. It felt quite stretched, and when I finished the last page I realised that not much had happened since the first chapter. The ending was unsatisfactory because there was no ending, and the nature and identity of the book's main antagonist was revealed way too early. But to be fair, the good elements are more numerous than the bad, and the fact that I gave this book three stars does not mean that I did not enjoy reading it. In the end, it only paves the way for an amazing conclusion to the trilogy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carl Alves

    I started reading this book immediately after Ilse Witch, and I’m glad to see that Terry Brooks is following his familiar pattern. In the first novel, he puts together a large group of people to go on an epic quest to find some powerful magic treasure and/or defeat a powerful foe (in this case there is both of these things). The group is now splintered into about five or six smaller groups. What I like about this trilogy is how Brooks has departed from the typical magical entity that has to be d I started reading this book immediately after Ilse Witch, and I’m glad to see that Terry Brooks is following his familiar pattern. In the first novel, he puts together a large group of people to go on an epic quest to find some powerful magic treasure and/or defeat a powerful foe (in this case there is both of these things). The group is now splintered into about five or six smaller groups. What I like about this trilogy is how Brooks has departed from the typical magical entity that has to be destroyed and is instead using an artificial intelligence system from the old world (our world) as the bad guy in this novel. It tests the characters in ways they haven’t been tested in the past, and forces them to dig deep to solve a problem that is far out of their comfort zone. It ties back into the start of Brooks’s Word and the Void series, and I enjoyed the symmetry. I think I may have enjoyed this perhaps a bit more than the Ilse Witch. The story branched off in a lot of different areas. Out of all the different storylines, I think I like the one with Bek and his sister the most. I could see where the story is going to head. She is going to finally realize that Bek and Walker have been telling the truth and she truly is Bek’s sister. I also think that she will switch sides and help Bek and company against Morgwahr in the final installment of the trilogy. I like how in this trilogy, there isn’t one but three different powerful enemies for the good guys to combat, and all three are very different. Although, Brooks is following his typical formula, he’s also giving enough different wrinkles to keep it interesting. Carl Alves – author of Two For Eternity

  3. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    I only discovered Brooks a few years ago, starting with the original Shannara series published in a single volume. At the time I remarked on how easy it was to see the progress he made as a writer from the first to the last of that series. The leap he made from those books to the Voyage of Shannara series is equally great. In these books the plot is more complex, the characters while still somewhat typecast are more interesting and the writing is smoother. My only gripe is with the names he give I only discovered Brooks a few years ago, starting with the original Shannara series published in a single volume. At the time I remarked on how easy it was to see the progress he made as a writer from the first to the last of that series. The leap he made from those books to the Voyage of Shannara series is equally great. In these books the plot is more complex, the characters while still somewhat typecast are more interesting and the writing is smoother. My only gripe is with the names he gives some places and people. Example? The voyage goes to a place left behind by the dead technology-dominated culture, but the name of the place is "Castledown" -- hardly a technological-linked name. On the other hand Walker Boh as the Druid's name is on the mark. If you love fantasy and haven't read this one, you won't be disappointed.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    I very rarely rate books as 5 stars on here, but Antrax was quite a treat. I was not expecting this book to take quite as many turns as it did, and the blend of Old World and New World fantasy of Shannara was exceptional. Sure, there were parts of the book that were predictable, but this was one storyline that had me hoping for different outcomes at almost every turn, never receiving them, but being content nonetheless. I'm sure a lot of fans were upset about how things ended up with this book, I very rarely rate books as 5 stars on here, but Antrax was quite a treat. I was not expecting this book to take quite as many turns as it did, and the blend of Old World and New World fantasy of Shannara was exceptional. Sure, there were parts of the book that were predictable, but this was one storyline that had me hoping for different outcomes at almost every turn, never receiving them, but being content nonetheless. I'm sure a lot of fans were upset about how things ended up with this book, but you have to hand it to Brooks. He sure found a way to make you feel that the characters in this book, (out of the entire Shannara series), were human; flawed to the core and never getting what they want or need, but developing and adapting throughout the experience.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    6.5/10 My initial review was deleted by mistake/my error and I don't have the patience to write it down again (especially for a book I am not that invested into and struggled through). This was better than the first in the series but not great overall. Too many characters whom none of which I cared for. I will finish the series but won't read anymore into the Shannara world. The saving grace of the last novel is it's the shortest of the three.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Andrew

    This second book in the Jerle Shannara trilogy is a darker tale than the first. It has the ambiance of a Science Fiction and Fantasy mix by introducing machines and computers like the first book but more so in this second novel. There were certainly surprising twists that leaves the reader dumbfounded but eager to read on. The team travels to the island that holds this mysterious magic while being pursued by the Ilse Witch in her goal to seek revenge on Walker Boh and to take possession of this This second book in the Jerle Shannara trilogy is a darker tale than the first. It has the ambiance of a Science Fiction and Fantasy mix by introducing machines and computers like the first book but more so in this second novel. There were certainly surprising twists that leaves the reader dumbfounded but eager to read on. The team travels to the island that holds this mysterious magic while being pursued by the Ilse Witch in her goal to seek revenge on Walker Boh and to take possession of this powerful magic. When they get to the island, the Great Druid Walker realizes that they were led there for more than the magic. They were led into a trap by the very thing that guards the treasure that he seeks. The group becomes scattered by a turn of events and Walker Boh is left in a dark maze to battle this thing on his own. Meanwhile, the Ilse Witch is never ending in her search for Walker and his companions. Antrax was the name given to the unseen enemy that traps souls and feeds off magic that anyone possesses. Walker has to obtain the magic that Antrax is guarding before it traps him forever in the underground prison which Antrax calls his home. The others in his party have their own battles to handle when they are separated. For some, the journey was meant to be an adventure but it turned out to be an absolute nightmare for all. It was hard to put this book down. Even though it was well into the night, I still couldn't tear myself away from it because I really needed to know what was going to happen next and I couldn't wait 24 hours more to find out. I was surprised by some of the things that happened to the heroes in the book and I can't imagine what is going to happen in the last book. The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara - Antrax is definitely more involved with the characters and what they discover on their journey than the first book. A lot is revealed to the reader about the fears, the challenges and hidden truths that you find out about your favorite characters.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Renay

    i am pleased to say that for a sequel, this book does not start with a tonne of information retelling the story of the last book. upon opening, it just gets straight into the next part of the story. by about chapter three or four, the briefest description of the previous books' most important follow on information has been given, and once again, one is lost and wrapped up in the wonders and pains of the voyage to uncover the mysterious magics that the remains of the party from book one have come i am pleased to say that for a sequel, this book does not start with a tonne of information retelling the story of the last book. upon opening, it just gets straight into the next part of the story. by about chapter three or four, the briefest description of the previous books' most important follow on information has been given, and once again, one is lost and wrapped up in the wonders and pains of the voyage to uncover the mysterious magics that the remains of the party from book one have come to find. expanding on the small amount of knowledge that book one revealed about the mysterious unknown magic, this story reveals, and makes understandable that which book one did not, while hinting at, and revealing bits of new mysteries as yet unguessed at. the "nobodies" from book one are built up in character, and their "somebody"-ness becomes bigger and more intriguing, and the sombodies from book one either die or unravel more parts of their own characters. awesome writing skills rom terry brooks make the reader unable to put this book down as well, and leaves enough mystery still uncoverd as to NEED to read the third book, requiring a quick trip to the library, with fingers crossed that it is available....

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    This book is more fast-paced than the first in the series, Ilse Witch. We get to know more of the characters, Tamis and Quentin, Ahren, Ryer, and of course Bek, Truls, Grianne, and Walker. The biggest new character is terrifying and all too relate-able in our world. My only trouble with this book is I don't see how all the characters are going to remain mentally intact after going through so many horrors. Sometimes it seems that Brooks throws too much at his characters and has you wondering if t This book is more fast-paced than the first in the series, Ilse Witch. We get to know more of the characters, Tamis and Quentin, Ahren, Ryer, and of course Bek, Truls, Grianne, and Walker. The biggest new character is terrifying and all too relate-able in our world. My only trouble with this book is I don't see how all the characters are going to remain mentally intact after going through so many horrors. Sometimes it seems that Brooks throws too much at his characters and has you wondering if there are any fluffy bunnies in their world. And you know a lot more is to come in book three!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    This might be my favorite book in the Shannara franchise. What Brooks brings to Antrax is not just a well written fantasy, but a joining together of fantasy and science fiction where elves and dwarves meet the computer systems and technology of the long forgotten past. Where the previous book, Isle Witch, gives the fantasy enthusiast enraptured by the world created by Brooks a taste of the Steampunk genre this book goes even further and it works out extremely well and not just because of the ble This might be my favorite book in the Shannara franchise. What Brooks brings to Antrax is not just a well written fantasy, but a joining together of fantasy and science fiction where elves and dwarves meet the computer systems and technology of the long forgotten past. Where the previous book, Isle Witch, gives the fantasy enthusiast enraptured by the world created by Brooks a taste of the Steampunk genre this book goes even further and it works out extremely well and not just because of the blending of the tech with the magic of the fantasy, but because it also adds to the overall story and gives the reader quite an awesome plot twist. This was a fast paced, action/adventure that was unlike the books before it. Exceptional IMHO.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Just a quick review. Overall I enjoyed the book like I do all Shannara books, but.... My only real issue with Antrax was that the story kept going back and forth. It felt a little contrived just to extend the length of the story, rather than furthering or enhancing the story. Don't get me wrong..I don't mean that it was so contrived it was bad...it just felt like there was a little bit more "back and forth" than there needed to be. I do love the premise of the Shannara characters coming face to fac Just a quick review. Overall I enjoyed the book like I do all Shannara books, but.... My only real issue with Antrax was that the story kept going back and forth. It felt a little contrived just to extend the length of the story, rather than furthering or enhancing the story. Don't get me wrong..I don't mean that it was so contrived it was bad...it just felt like there was a little bit more "back and forth" than there needed to be. I do love the premise of the Shannara characters coming face to face with a living remnant from the past (e.g. "our world"). It sort helped tie the long-term storyline together a bit.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Drew Warner

    Antrax was much better than Isle Witch. While it still has the problems of a middle book, it leaves the reader with a sense that something was accomplished--oddly enough the very thing I felt was lacking in Isle Witch. For Brooks fans who have struggled through Isle Witch Antrax is a breath of fresh air in this trilogy. The action is much better, though still not on par with his other, earlier novels, but the phrasing and vocabulary still seem out of place for his usual writing style. The charact Antrax was much better than Isle Witch. While it still has the problems of a middle book, it leaves the reader with a sense that something was accomplished--oddly enough the very thing I felt was lacking in Isle Witch. For Brooks fans who have struggled through Isle Witch Antrax is a breath of fresh air in this trilogy. The action is much better, though still not on par with his other, earlier novels, but the phrasing and vocabulary still seem out of place for his usual writing style. The characters--namely Bek, Ahren, and Quentin--really evolve in this novel. Without revealing anything: difficult choices are made, maturity is revealed, and some hard realities are faced. The story itself is a great combination of fantasy and science-fiction. It has enough twists to keep you guessing (though some were pretty easy to guess) and enough mystery to make you want to buy Morgawr (book three). Why you should pick it up: You've read Isle Witch, it's a good sequel, strong action, good character development, interesting story elements. Why you should leave it: Not his best writing, not his best storyline, some pretty cheesy characters/"dramatic scenes", the ending points in a very obvious direction (I hope I have to eat my words after reading Morgawr, but at the rate this trilogy is going I doubt that I will).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rick Piatt

    This was such an unexpected gem. The first book started out formulaic but by the end Brooks had pulled it all together to make it a 4 star read. Typically 2nd books in trilogies are just setup books and as a result are the worst of the set. Well that does not apply to Antrax. This book started out ok and in no time at all it kicked into a higher gear than I've seen since Elfstones of Shannara. There was so much character development I had doubts this was a Shannara book at all. Brooks' books are This was such an unexpected gem. The first book started out formulaic but by the end Brooks had pulled it all together to make it a 4 star read. Typically 2nd books in trilogies are just setup books and as a result are the worst of the set. Well that does not apply to Antrax. This book started out ok and in no time at all it kicked into a higher gear than I've seen since Elfstones of Shannara. There was so much character development I had doubts this was a Shannara book at all. Brooks' books are a lot of fun but not exactly deep in character dev. Then add so many twists and turns that completely blindsided me and an end I still can't get over. Add in a strong dose of apocalyptic technology and some truly horrifying scenes, well all I can say is "Holy cow!" Well done Mr. Brooks. Very well done indeed. Yeah this one goes 5-Stars. Now I'm really scared ... How can the next book ever hope to pick up where this left off?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Squire

    #19/29 in my Epic Shannara Quest. One of a small handful of great Shannara books. Unusually dark and well-told tale about a meeting of the Old World before the Great Wars and the World of Shannara. Technology and magic collide in this middle section of The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara that is full of terrific character embellishments and unforseen events to make for an exhilerating read. Imaginatively, intellectually and emotionally satisfying, this is the "better story" I hoped Brooks was lookin #19/29 in my Epic Shannara Quest. One of a small handful of great Shannara books. Unusually dark and well-told tale about a meeting of the Old World before the Great Wars and the World of Shannara. Technology and magic collide in this middle section of The Voyage of the Jerle Shannara that is full of terrific character embellishments and unforseen events to make for an exhilerating read. Imaginatively, intellectually and emotionally satisfying, this is the "better story" I hoped Brooks was looking towards as he played by the numbers in the dreary Ilse Witch, making the slog through that book soooooooo worth the effort.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    So where were we? Ah, yes, a giant, weather-controlling, all-powerful, almost-as-smart-as-Mike-Thayer, computer vs. the forces of both good and evil. The book starts off with our heroes in distress and scattered to the four winds. The book then proceeds to proceed for several hundred pages, and ends rather dramatically by leaving our heroes distressed and scattered to the four winds. The End. So what do I do? On to book #3!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sallee

    This is the middle book of a trilogy and I haven't read either the first or the third yet. This book did stand on its own but I felt that I was missing the whole picture so I have reserved 1 and 3 from my library. Terry Brooks is a great writer but like all series some of the books are better than the others. This one I feel is not one of those. It was interesting enough that I do want to read the others to see the whole picture.

  16. 5 out of 5

    John Arnold

    I started off thinking technology in the fantasy world would be blah, until I realized the tie in. It is amazing that a person wrote a book decades ago and tied it in so well in this series and Armageddons Children! Abosolutely worth the read

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    In this sequel to Ilse Witch, Brooks doesn't disapoint. Stranded on the island, the survivors of the first book attempt to stay survivors. But is that possible, when the land contains vicious monsters, and twisted robots constructed of the body parts of humans?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Savi

    exciting and adventurous read as usual, not my favorite Brooks book though.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brett

    This is Brooks at his best. What more can you ask for in an epic fantasy novel? I am excited to read the conclusion of the series.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    This book just shows the depth of imagination that Terry Brooks has...absolutely blew my mind!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Child_reborn

    Niiiiice concept. A very powerful druid, entering a lair of a modern age computer complex, Guarded by droids and indestructible cyborg killers. All overseen by a computer... great thrill

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan D

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a FANTASTIC read. Normally it takes me a week to read Terry Brooks books, but this time it was so easy to read because the story was told so beautifully. Brooks used so many tropes, so many parallels, so many concepts and themes that I can't possible list them all here, so I'll just name the ones that really stuck out to me. I really liked how Brooks used Redemption throughout the book. The Isle Witch(one of the three antagonists in the series) is used as an analogy for fallen people(in This was a FANTASTIC read. Normally it takes me a week to read Terry Brooks books, but this time it was so easy to read because the story was told so beautifully. Brooks used so many tropes, so many parallels, so many concepts and themes that I can't possible list them all here, so I'll just name the ones that really stuck out to me. I really liked how Brooks used Redemption throughout the book. The Isle Witch(one of the three antagonists in the series) is used as an analogy for fallen people(in my opinion, sinners) and the Main Character, Bek, throughout the book, believes that no one, no matter what horrific things they have done, is too far from redemption. Ahren Elessedil(an elvish prince sent on the voyage), has many problems, one of which is Cowardice. However, another character convinces him that while his cowardice was wrong, he is still redeemable and he plays a pivotal role in the climax of the book. Ryer Ord Star(the character who convinced Ahren that he was redeemable), also is redeemed from something that she does in the novel. The concept of forgiveness and redemption is just so refreshing in the novel, and I could talk this whole post about more, but I'll get to other things. On a very different note, there is a character, Truls Ruhk who in the previous book was laid out as a metaphor for the "Elephant Man". In this book, Brooks continues to use this metaphor and brings the reader to the concensus that even though neither of Truls Ruhk's parents wanted him, his life(at conception, decades before this book takes place) was important and that he had value and a place on earth, even if he was unwanted(which seems to me to be a pro-life argument, but maybe it isn't?). There is also the concept of chivalry in Quentin Leah(which is used with almost EVERY SINGLE LEAH CHARACTER in the series, but I digress). He continues the trope of a hero who is willing to sacrifice his life for others, whether it be his little "brother" Bek or his fighting companion, Tamus. Walker Boh, who was really the principle protagonist of the first book, is really abscent for the first half of the novel and doesn't even become a major part of the book until the last hundred pages. However, what Brooks lacks in length, he more than makes up for in depth. Walker has the most important arc and has realizes the importance of self sacrifice, which is the singular most important trope in literature(in my opinion). He realizes that he must give up what he most desparately wants in order to save others. He lays aside everything that he has worked for the past several books aside so that he can ensure that others survive literally and metaphorically. He has great character growth and I can't praise it enough. Another postitive thing I can say is that it was the exact right length. With some of Brooks' novels, there can be wasted space or needless repetition. However, in this 375 page book(which seems to be his recent gold standard) rehashes plot and expositions just enough to remind you and almost every single thing is paid off in the end. If Brooks' later books in the series progress like the last two have, he will have earned his spot as one of the best Fantasy authors in history.... ...But now to some gripes. Minor Gripes. The principle antagonist of this book, Antrax, is present for a very short amount of time. In fact, the title character has one of the smallest amounts of "screen"(or book?) time of any of the main characters(and he's the TITLE CHARACTER!). I think Brooks' underused Antrax because Antrax is just toooooooo creepy and evil(notice I haven't used personal pronouns for Antrax, there is a specific reason for that). My point is that the villain was ok, but not great, and could have been utilized just a little more. The book's "hook" for the next one litterally comes out of no-where and feels tacked on, even though it is needed. I realized I had 3 pages left and not enough of a hook for the next book, so I kind of knew what was coming. In conclusion, Antrax is an amazing book that made me feel excited that I'm reading fantasy. It had some problems, but not too significant, so I'll give it a 8.7 out of 10. Way to go Terry!

  23. 5 out of 5

    C.J. Edmunds

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I don't know if its both the writing and the fact that I have not gone back to reading Terry Brooks in years that made this such a fast and pleasurable read. Following the events of Isle Witch, the Druid Walker Boh finds himself trapped beneath Castledown, a fortress that is said to be where the fabled Books of Magic are housed. Retrieving these relics would mean hope for the Races of the Four Lands, as these tomes would provide helpful information to further the different Societies, from Elves, I don't know if its both the writing and the fact that I have not gone back to reading Terry Brooks in years that made this such a fast and pleasurable read. Following the events of Isle Witch, the Druid Walker Boh finds himself trapped beneath Castledown, a fortress that is said to be where the fabled Books of Magic are housed. Retrieving these relics would mean hope for the Races of the Four Lands, as these tomes would provide helpful information to further the different Societies, from Elves, Dwarves and Humans. But the company onboard the airship, Jerle Shannara have been attacked by the ship, Black Moclips and have been scattered throughout. At the center of this attack is the Isle Witch, a descendant of the Ohmsford line and who holds much power and commands the ability of the Wishsong- the magical ability to effect things into being by the use of her voice. Unbeknownst to her, she has been tricked by her mentor called the Morgawr, by purporting that it was the Druid Walker Boh who has killed her parents when she was child and it is he, her mentor, who saved her from the onslaught. Fueled by hate and revenge, she has thwarted Walker's plan repeatedly and has kidnapped a boy named Bek, one of the members of the company onboard the Jerle Shannara and who continually tells her the truth about who she is and is convinced that he is her long lost brother, Bek Ohmsford and she is her sister, Grianne. For how could they not be other than blood relative for he, like her, also has the power of the Wishsong. But if that is not enough to deal with, beneath Castledown is an entity called Antrax that thrives and lives off magic. It has done that for years and is need of a new magical power source. And with the Isle Witch and Druid both vying for time and the chance to obtain the magical books of power stored underneath, the results of the voyage are left up to fate and to the sharpness of their respective skill set. Like my other favorite Terry Brooks book, the Elfstones of Shannara, the book is equally and adeptly divided into alternating chapters to show each character's arc, motivations and written in the clear and definitive style that has marked Brooks' writing for years ever since the first book, The Sword of Shannara came out in the 70s. As a writer, I have heard that the key to effective writing is to keep it simple and informative. And coming back to Brooks, whom I also consider one of my writing gurus, it is a refresher course of sorts for me to come back to reading fantasy. From effective world building, to pacing and showing character motivation, reading Brooks again, has certainly reconfirmed why he is at the top of his game and compared to another one out there, and in line with the recent artist-shaming controversy, Brooks clearly is the better Terry! (Take that, Goodkind) Time to move onto Book 3 of the Voyage of the Jerle Shannara which is Morgawr. And yes, back to reading hardcovers! Hardcovers are Looooooove to any reader!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maria Rose

    For some reason, I skipped posting the review for this book when I read this trilogy, but I am posting one now a few months later from my read. This book continues the tale of the group with Walker to find out what happened to the Blue Elfstones. They have made it to the final site called Parkasia, where they find a city inhabited only by machines because the supercomputer center called Antrax had gone rogue in keeping its program running, in seeking knowledge, it eliminated all biologic element For some reason, I skipped posting the review for this book when I read this trilogy, but I am posting one now a few months later from my read. This book continues the tale of the group with Walker to find out what happened to the Blue Elfstones. They have made it to the final site called Parkasia, where they find a city inhabited only by machines because the supercomputer center called Antrax had gone rogue in keeping its program running, in seeking knowledge, it eliminated all biologic elements as enemies but utilizes magic as an energy source. The group was divided by circumstances into 3 parties. Walker by himself infiltrated the main Tower but was captured and unable to leave. Bek Ohmsford, with the sword of Shannara, confronts the Isle Witch into realizing she is Grinne Olmsford, his sister, with Truls Rohk help, so she will realize her true fate in life. Ahren Elessedil with Quentin Leah rescues the Blue Elfstones with the help of the local natives. Walker is found by Bek and the Ilse Witch mortally wounded from his battle destroying the supercomputer Antrax. He did try to save the knowledge but the AI has been corrupted. He chooses the Isle Witch as the next Druid to continue the line.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Neville Ridley-smith

    Almost 4 stars but not quite. The general plot was quite good. The thing is, I think another writer could have written the exact same plot but in a more exciting style. I feel that Brooks is quite often telling and not showing - there's just so much explaining of the thinking going on in people's heads rather than actual dialogue and action to indicate the same information. And the magic is pretty hand-wavy. Pretty exciting ending though. Yet another great cliff-hanger!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ian yarington

    So far with this series I've been happy with the continuation of Walker and the way Brooks continues his character while introducing new ones. The blend of the familiar and the new is really nice and I feel like Brooks is just now getting into the blend. I was surprised when, SPOILERS, we found out there were other Ohmsford's and that part is really fun to read. Overall I'm really enjoying the series and excited for the next book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Maggies_lens

    omfg NOTHING happened for about 98% of this book. Nothing! constant running around some bloody metal maze and a swift, mind-numbingly boring decent into tech-talk. I skimmed this one, lingering on the ONLY good thing about this book; the Isle witch herself. If it were not for her I would have given up this series after 2 chapters.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ben Stivers

    So, this book was good. It delivered the goods, BUT, Terry spent a LOT of time picking a topic and going over it in one character’s head and the another and then another and then....well, you get the idea. The book could easily have been 100 pages shorter. Still, the book was good but a lot of inane drama.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Good book. Makes you really think about mankind progress. We live in a world that seems like it is moving forward. Terry Brooks reminds us that great nations have fallen, and that technology isn't a safeguard from destruction and ruin.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Damon Mcwalters

    Another great book, the 2nd in the trilogy, can't wait for 3rd. This was a great twist to most books. I like the way it reveals something of the past...without spoiling the book, I enjoyed this historical twist, post apocalyptic if you will.

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