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The Art of Steampunk PDF, ePub eBook The Art of Steampunk seeks to celebrate the world of Steampunk: a world filled with beauty and innovation.  A world in which steam power and technology intertwine to create machines that are not only functional and practical, but unique and striking.    Inside, you will find the fantastical and stunning artwork of Steampunk artists from around the world.  The 17 artists fe The Art of Steampunk seeks to celebrate the world of Steampunk: a world filled with beauty and innovation.  A world in which steam power and technology intertwine to create machines that are not only functional and practical, but unique and striking.    Inside, you will find the fantastical and stunning artwork of Steampunk artists from around the world.  The 17 artists featured on these pages, among the frontrunners of the Steampunk genre, have had their work displayed at an exhibition at The Museum of History of Science at the University of Oxford, UK and have attracted the media attention of BoingBoing, one of the world’s largest blogs.  Their artwork consists of everything from clocks and watches to light fixtures and jewelry, but every piece demonstrates hours of painstaking work and devotion from its creator.  You will find that the artists themselves are just as unique and colorful as their masterpieces.  Fully embracing Steampunk ideology, many have adopted a Victorian alter ego—a mad scientist persona to match the complicated intricacies of their artwork.     The Art of Steampunk brings the vision of the Steampunk artist alive on the page, providing a unique insight into the captivating and dynamic world of a vastly underground genre.

30 review for The Art of Steampunk

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    This book records the steampunk exhibit at Oxford University's Museum of the History of Science from October 2009 to February 2010. The highlight for me was the mechanical womb, though there were pieces featured which were much more beautiful and fantastical to look at. The womb idea just gives me a dash of the heebie jeebies, which I like. Do people still leave out coffee-table books? If so, this would be an ideal coffee-table book. I loved every photo. The steampunk genre has been gaining a bi This book records the steampunk exhibit at Oxford University's Museum of the History of Science from October 2009 to February 2010. The highlight for me was the mechanical womb, though there were pieces featured which were much more beautiful and fantastical to look at. The womb idea just gives me a dash of the heebie jeebies, which I like. Do people still leave out coffee-table books? If so, this would be an ideal coffee-table book. I loved every photo. The steampunk genre has been gaining a bit more steam lately (ha, I'm not within lynching range for that terrible comment) and anyone the slightest bit curious or interested in steampunk related art or inspiration for steampunk fiction would benefit from this book. And besides, specific art books such as this are fun and not common enough. For myself, I find the whole idea of steampunk worlds romantic and exciting and the artists included in this book capture those feelings perfectly.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rae

    Over the years, I’ve noticed that being an artist myself has tended to make me a bit more of a picky reader when it comes to art books. I hold these books to a much higher standard, and not all of them rise to those expectations, so when I say that “The Art of Steampunk” is an excellent art book, I mean fantastic! “The Art of Steampunk” is a way for those that couldn’t see the steampunk exhibit at the Museum of History of Science in Oxford, England to experience the amazing collection of steam Over the years, I’ve noticed that being an artist myself has tended to make me a bit more of a picky reader when it comes to art books. I hold these books to a much higher standard, and not all of them rise to those expectations, so when I say that “The Art of Steampunk” is an excellent art book, I mean fantastic! “The Art of Steampunk” is a way for those that couldn’t see the steampunk exhibit at the Museum of History of Science in Oxford, England to experience the amazing collection of steampunk creations that were displayed there. The book opens up with an introduction to just what exactly steampunk is, the popularity of it, and the culture that has sprung up around it. “The Art of Steampunk” even goes as far in this introduction to explore the entomology of the word “steampunk.” The artists that are featured and their creations range greatly: young to old, clockwork to clothing, and of all sorts of complexity. However, the passion that these artists share for their craft is very much exhibited in the short bio articles that precede the pictures of their steampunk works of art. Each picture is crisp and beautifully captures the detail of each piece, and the photographer even managed to manipulate the light so that there are no pesky reflections despite all of the possibly reflective metallic surfaces. I would be a poor reviewer if I mentioned the quality of the art and the photographs yet neglected to complement the quality of the layout in this book. The pages are colored and occasionally even patterned to give them an older feel that fits perfectly with the Victorian style that steampunk borrows so heavily from. The book designers, Lindsay Hess and Jason Deller, smartly chose a color palette full of coppers, sepias, and golds- a smart choice that provided the perfect finishing touch in establishing the atmosphere of the book. So, as an artist and as a reader, I would most certainly recommend “The Art of Steampunk” for anyone that is interested in history, costuming, sculpture, or of course, steampunk.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    (I am classifying this as british because the exhibition was at oxford and lets give props where they are due) being the traitor I am I bought this at st. marks books last night and the guy at the cashier actually started talking to me about his nerdiness, I assume based on my nerdiness. Well this book is about the importance of the prominence of the object. in a modern time everything is sleek and streamlined and the same (except apple which has suddenly decided to make things bigger, weird I kn (I am classifying this as british because the exhibition was at oxford and lets give props where they are due) being the traitor I am I bought this at st. marks books last night and the guy at the cashier actually started talking to me about his nerdiness, I assume based on my nerdiness. Well this book is about the importance of the prominence of the object. in a modern time everything is sleek and streamlined and the same (except apple which has suddenly decided to make things bigger, weird I know). Steampunk according to this book is about making functional objects (cameras, phones, and computers) that are also art objects. This really relates to when people talk these days about why people go to stores when it is easier and cheaper to shop online. Well the answer is of course the experience of the store. Steampunk is about why objects are still important in the digital age, it's a respect of the space occupied by an object and the emotion given by an object. steampunk is about the importance of the existant above all else. at least when it's art.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jodi

    This book is gorgeous. I love just about everything in it, all the work is of such a high quality. My favourites hands down are the beautiful laptop computers though...I want one so so much. True genius! You can see it here too: http://www.datamancer.net/steampunkla...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    The world’s first exhibition of Steampunk art was held at The Museum of History of Science at the University of Oxford from October 2009 to February 2010. It was a success and drew large crowds of visitors to the museum. This catalog is the result of that exhibition, now in a form where it can be owned, admired, and instructive to those who were not able to make it to the actual event. In The Art of Steampunk, Donovan attempts to give a summary definition of Steampunk in this catalog, which is me The world’s first exhibition of Steampunk art was held at The Museum of History of Science at the University of Oxford from October 2009 to February 2010. It was a success and drew large crowds of visitors to the museum. This catalog is the result of that exhibition, now in a form where it can be owned, admired, and instructive to those who were not able to make it to the actual event. In The Art of Steampunk, Donovan attempts to give a summary definition of Steampunk in this catalog, which is meant to appeal to both Steampunk enthusiasts and the layman who knows nothing of the genre and is experiencing it for the first time through the exhibition. We also get a short history of the genre, and samples of work and bios of many of the artists currently creating Steampunk art. The typography and page layout of this book really worked to compliment the art shown in the photographs, which made the catalog much more appealing to readers and evocative of the idea of steampunk. Nothing can replace the experience of viewing these 3-dimensional art pieces up close and in person, but the photographs still portray enough of the pieces to leave you with a sense of wonder and appreciation for the art. My recommendation? Have this on hand for when you need a point of reference while reading Westerfeld’s Leviathan or Pullman’s The Golden Compass. Or just keep it on your coffee table to tickle the imagination of guests.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    MY THOUGHTS ABSOLUTELY LOVED IT What a treasure trove of artifacts are contained in this latest edition of The Art of Steampunk. I have several books on Steampunk art and a large collection of fiction based on the art. This book brings to life some of my favorite things about the movement. It is neatly divided into artists and also contains a section on the Art of Steampunk that was presented in England. I found some new artists like Jessica Joslin and Eric Freitas that have some amazing sculpture MY THOUGHTS ABSOLUTELY LOVED IT What a treasure trove of artifacts are contained in this latest edition of The Art of Steampunk. I have several books on Steampunk art and a large collection of fiction based on the art. This book brings to life some of my favorite things about the movement. It is neatly divided into artists and also contains a section on the Art of Steampunk that was presented in England. I found some new artists like Jessica Joslin and Eric Freitas that have some amazing sculptures. It also contains the art of Richard Nagy, creator or the steampunk computer. The pictures are of very high quality and nicely laid out with a page about each artist and then a few more with lovely snaps of their work. I found so many things I would love to own and display. I just love the whole style of this art work. This would make a wonderful gift for lovers of the odd and unique. I thought this was a bit more educational than the first edition with more information about the whole movement. I wish that some of my favorite steampunk authors would have been mentioned to round things out. You can check out Jules Verne, Cassandra Clare, or Gail Carriger who are all amazing authors.

  7. 5 out of 5

    KimberlyRose

    Disappointing because my expectations were set at a more rounded, detailed look at the art of steampunk in general, around the world, over time, etc. I suppose I should have read the back cover more carefully. Its focus on a single 2010 exhibit in Oxford was extremely limiting, but what was within its covers was passably interesting. The art was glossy and bright, photographed to highlight the best of the exhibit. I must be on a different vein of the steampunk aesthetic from the curator of the e Disappointing because my expectations were set at a more rounded, detailed look at the art of steampunk in general, around the world, over time, etc. I suppose I should have read the back cover more carefully. Its focus on a single 2010 exhibit in Oxford was extremely limiting, but what was within its covers was passably interesting. The art was glossy and bright, photographed to highlight the best of the exhibit. I must be on a different vein of the steampunk aesthetic from the curator of the exhibit, because most of the artists and their various mediums and styles in this book were either boring or unappealing to me. Solid snippets of information on the steampunk movement. Reasonably entertaining to flip through. A good waiting room book--far superior to smack crap magazines about actors' personal lives.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mscout

    This book is more of a museum catalog than an actual text. It covers the eponymous exhibit at the Oxford University Museum of the History of Science that was held October 2009-February 2010. Calling it a catalog does do something of a disservice. There are no fewer than three introductory-type chapters that explain the phenomena and philosophy of Steampunk (in somewhat repetitive fashion, alas). After that there are individual chapters on each of the artists, along with some highlights of their This book is more of a museum catalog than an actual text. It covers the eponymous exhibit at the Oxford University Museum of the History of Science that was held October 2009-February 2010. Calling it a catalog does do something of a disservice. There are no fewer than three introductory-type chapters that explain the phenomena and philosophy of Steampunk (in somewhat repetitive fashion, alas). After that there are individual chapters on each of the artists, along with some highlights of their work. While a great deal of the work is standard steampunk fare of goggles and timepieces (even so, beautifully done) two artists, Kris Kuksi and Richard Nagy, stand out. Kuksi’s pieces are sculptural rather than wearable, and the level of detail is amazing, while Nagy tackles digital machines for the Victorian age. This volume is a fun addition to any enthusiast’s library.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Miranda

    I loved this! The Art of Steampunk features a great selection of artists from the steampunk movement, along with examples of their art. Obvious enough. It also has a great essay called "Steampunk 101." For those of us who have picked up that Steampunk is Victorian, techy, and science fiction, but aren't sure how that fits together into steampunk, this essay answers a lot of burning questions. I spent a lot of time going back through and studying the art in this book. Just awesome.

  10. 4 out of 5

    James

    I read the earlier edition, not much difference. If you like steampunk art it's a nice book, though I hate sneaky second editions.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn

    Is as great as a read as it is good looking .

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    wow people are so imaginative i love it i really loved the bat and the little scarabs i would love one for myself!!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    George Siehl

    This book is essentially an after-the-event catalog for an exhibition of steampunk creations held at the Oxford University Museum of the History of Science in 2009-2010. It is copiously illustrated, contains brief bio sketches of the 18 contributing artists from 8 countries, and includes introductory essays by Art Donovan, who curated the show, Museum Director, Jim Bennett, and author/lecturer G. D. Falksen. The articles exhibit the great imagination and craftsmanship of their creators. This is This book is essentially an after-the-event catalog for an exhibition of steampunk creations held at the Oxford University Museum of the History of Science in 2009-2010. It is copiously illustrated, contains brief bio sketches of the 18 contributing artists from 8 countries, and includes introductory essays by Art Donovan, who curated the show, Museum Director, Jim Bennett, and author/lecturer G. D. Falksen. The articles exhibit the great imagination and craftsmanship of their creators. This is steampunk in 3-D, with wearable items, jewelry, operating devices, costume accoutrements, and sculptural works. The range and novelty of the items expresses the fun and whimsy that steampunk holds in the hands of these "makers," as the academic community would identify them. Falksen's essay is quite helpful in explaining what steampunk is all about. His definition of the term is crisp: "Victorian science fiction." He says, for modern authors "Steampunk becomes a reimagining of the nineteenth century with a view of where science will one day go." He recognizes the breadth of the genre, writing that "Steampunk often works to translate modern concepts such as the computer revolution, spy thrillers, noir mysteries, and even the internet into a Victorian context using Victorian technology." The book is a treat from the photographs alone, but the text is a real bonus.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stella

    A book detailing the art and artists featured in the first ever Steampunk exhibition held at the Oxford University's Museum of the History of Science in 2009-2010. With introductory essays and biographies of each artist, this is a very good blend of photos and words. An excellent introduction to a number of now famous Steampunk artists...In fact, I wish I'd read this book before a couple of others!

  15. 4 out of 5

    to'c

    OK, I have to admit it. I got this book for the pictures. And quite a lot of nice pictures there are. Fascinating works with a unifying theme but very different approaches and philosophies. I wish I had seen the exhibit.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tahlia Newland

    Steampunk novels are hitting our shelves in big numbers these days and many are wondering what Steampunk actually is and where it comes from. This book on the art of Steampunk will fill you in on such details and provide you with delightful visions to help flesh out your imagination when you read a Steampunk novel. From whimsical to elegant, I loved all the artworks in this book. It made me wish I’d never thrown away the old valve radio my parents had and inspired me to seek out any cog in my wo Steampunk novels are hitting our shelves in big numbers these days and many are wondering what Steampunk actually is and where it comes from. This book on the art of Steampunk will fill you in on such details and provide you with delightful visions to help flesh out your imagination when you read a Steampunk novel. From whimsical to elegant, I loved all the artworks in this book. It made me wish I’d never thrown away the old valve radio my parents had and inspired me to seek out any cog in my workshop and see what I could do with it. Among other things, the author tells us that … ‘Steam punk is Victorian science fiction. Here ‘Victorian’ is not meant to depict a specific culture but rather references a time period and aesthetic … Steam punk uses the existing technology and structure [of the time] to imagine an even more advanced nineteenth century, often complete with Victorian-inspired wonders like steampowered aircraft and mechanical computers….’ ‘The line between Steampunk and period Victorian is extremely narrow and often the two are indistinguishable. They are separated only by Steampunk’s status as science fiction, albeit heavily inspired by the historical facts of the Victorian period…. Steampunk becomes the perfect blending of alternate history and science fiction.’ ‘The steam part of Steampunk refers to a world in which steam power is both dominant and prolific.’ The punk part of Steampunk is a ‘tongue-in-cheek reference to cyber-punk rather than a reference to the punk subculture… a Steampunk equivalent to twentieth century punk can be found in nineteenth century counterculture groups raging from Luddites to utopians to hooligans. Add a dash of Victorian street culture and a sprinkling of ragtime and Steampunk ‘punk’ comes into focus.’ Gears are the key icon of the genre as well as it related pistons and flywheels. Goggles are often seen in the genre but only when useful, not as a fashion statement. Fashion wise the Steampunk genre allows people to ‘sample and even combine a range of clothing and accessories from across the nineteenth century world.…a world where fashion is tailored to the individual, goods are made to last and machinery is still regarded as a thing of visual majesty.’ I highly recommend this book for everyone, but especially for fans of Steampunk. It’s a perfect gift for your parents if you want them to understand why you’re wearing old flying goggles on your pushbike. Five stars.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anna W.

    Release Date: August 1, 2011 Publisher: Fox Chapel I received a copy of this book as a courtesy from the team at Fox Chapel after running into them at BEA2011 this past month in my professional capacity. I’m not sure they knew I was also a book blogger, but this one was too exciting not to talk about. A fan of steampunk literature, I was immediately intrigued by the content. So used to building the worlds in my head, coupled together from snippets I’ve seen of Victorian technology and fashion, tidb Release Date: August 1, 2011
 Publisher: Fox Chapel I received a copy of this book as a courtesy from the team at Fox Chapel after running into them at BEA2011 this past month in my professional capacity. I’m not sure they knew I was also a book blogger, but this one was too exciting not to talk about. A fan of steampunk literature, I was immediately intrigued by the content. So used to building the worlds in my head, coupled together from snippets I’ve seen of Victorian technology and fashion, tidbits of old Jules Verne and the more recent Wild Wild West (1999) and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003) films, I was psyched about seeing some of the world come to real, hard life. After all, imagination has its limits. What better way to flesh it out than with photographs? And, in The Art of Steampunk, the steampunk world really does take full form. Inside are well over 100 full color photos of some of the most intricate and finely crafted oddities you’ll ever see. From Eric Freitas’ exquisite and ethereal clocks, to Kris Kuksi’s detailed warships—oh, and don’t miss Richard Nagy’s fully-functioning brass, leather, and copper laptops—the 17 artists showcased here have really populated the world of idea with extraordinary reality. Their pieces, all exhibited at Oxford University’s Museum of the History of Science 2009-10 Steampunk show (curator, Art Donovan), will make you catch your breath. The intricate delicacy, brassy trim work, and tongue-in-cheek aplomb continually snagged me between the urgent desire to linger and the giddy itch to flip to the next discovery. Truly, whether chuckling or scrutinizing, you can’t help but marvel at the all-around genius of their painstaking handiwork. The only flaw I saw in the book was its overemphasis on preserving the details of the Oxford exhibition, which I fear may give shelf-browsers the impression that it’s more a commemorative booklet of the event than a printed showcase of the art. However, as redundant as the forward, introduction, and introductory essay become by page 33, the front matter does contain some truly enlightening information about steampunk subculture and its art that explicate in enough detail to enlighten both newcomers and die-hard fans alike. Verdict? A must for the avid steampunker. (This review was originally published at http://booknotized.wordpress.com)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Fisk

    If you have any interest in the Steampunk movement, you will probably have heard of the London exhibit that brought together Steampunk artists from all over the world. Art Donovan was the curator of that exhibit, and this tabletop book is a glimpse into the artwork and the artists from that presentation. Steampunk is an odd combination of literature and an esthetic. It’s the design and costuming that is demonstrated through these images. However, the influence of both the Victorian Age and Steamp If you have any interest in the Steampunk movement, you will probably have heard of the London exhibit that brought together Steampunk artists from all over the world. Art Donovan was the curator of that exhibit, and this tabletop book is a glimpse into the artwork and the artists from that presentation. Steampunk is an odd combination of literature and an esthetic. It’s the design and costuming that is demonstrated through these images. However, the influence of both the Victorian Age and Steampunk literature is evident. The literature shows through the steam weapons, zeppelin structures, and pieces like the squid attack goggles by Joey Marsocci. The book starts with an explanation of Steampunk that has a few interesting facts even for those aware of the culture, as well as giving newcomers a reasonable basis in the culture. My only quibble is the suggestion that the “punk” in the name has nothing to do with the examination of society through outliers, something that both the influence of Charles Dickens and the fact that early Steampunk literature did explore the impact of technology on society deny. Oh, and the articles even explain goggles. However, that’s a minor disagreement compared to a visual bounty of works, some of which I’d seen through the video interview of the actual exhibit, but in the book you get not only the pictures but the placards and small bios, some tongue in cheek, of the artists themselves. The book is 132 pages, the majority of which are taken up by at least one piece if not several of Steampunk design. The range is broad from heat differential engines run on tea lights to attack machine models complete with crews to actual working clocks, both in Victorian style and in the “aviator” style adopted by Steampunk. It’s a beautiful book of an exhibit I would have loved to see, which is why, when it came up for review on Net Galley, I requested a copy. My only regret is that this is a time limited galley, because I could see myself returning to these photographs for inspiration for my next Steampunk story.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steven Brown

    "If upon viewing a piece one does not ask, 'Does that actually work?' then Williford considers the piece a failure" This clear, crisp, and colorful catalog of an exhibit at the Oxford University's Museum of Science offers items from the quirky "does that actually work" end of the spectrum to that of the expensive art object. I find too much of the latter in the exhibit, but they're all worth a look. I suppose I associate the steampunk movement too much with homemade assemblages, rather than obvi "If upon viewing a piece one does not ask, 'Does that actually work?' then Williford considers the piece a failure" This clear, crisp, and colorful catalog of an exhibit at the Oxford University's Museum of Science offers items from the quirky "does that actually work" end of the spectrum to that of the expensive art object. I find too much of the latter in the exhibit, but they're all worth a look. I suppose I associate the steampunk movement too much with homemade assemblages, rather than obviously expensive (if whimsical) pieces of art. Well, an original Corliss engine didn't come cheap back in the day and there are several examples of costumes and jewelry that one would delight to see someone wearing. Before grousing about the art objects too much, let me praise (as an H.G. Wells reader) Ian Chricton's late Victorian artificial environment device for preserving a sample of the red week brought with the Martian invasion. I should also mention the generous sampling of Stirling engine devices by Jos de Vink. How I long to see them running. A very brief introductory essay gets readers oriented and brief entries on the various artists give interesting details on their approach to their steampunk art and the origin of their interest. I do regret that the book did not include photographs from the final section of the exhibit - actual machines from the steam era. That would have been a delight and instructive to a newcomer to Victorian technology. As is pointed out in the text, many period photographs exist to inspire those interested in the era, but they, of course, are not in color. The book stresses how the "punk" part of steampunk addresses individuality and a rebellion against the common design look of modern consumer goods. Interesting that the Arts & Crafts movement began as a rebellion agains the design look of mass manufactured goods of the very Victorian industrialisation that steampunk celebrates. In both cases the result seems to be the same in many cases: the creation of items for the wealthy collector or museum.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    Pages: 128 Genre: Art Exhibit The Dame's Review: Steampunk by its very conception was meant to be quirky and odd-placed, not-of-this timeframe; actually, quite disarranged. In this collection of museum-exhibited pieces of steampunkery (if that's even a word)we find a daunting group of work from artists of all minds and capabilities. I found this book both charming and awe-inspiring. I could look at it over and over for ages. Art Donovan, the man who coordinated the exhibit and compiled the works in Pages: 128 Genre: Art Exhibit The Dame's Review: Steampunk by its very conception was meant to be quirky and odd-placed, not-of-this timeframe; actually, quite disarranged. In this collection of museum-exhibited pieces of steampunkery (if that's even a word)we find a daunting group of work from artists of all minds and capabilities. I found this book both charming and awe-inspiring. I could look at it over and over for ages. Art Donovan, the man who coordinated the exhibit and compiled the works in this small book, has a keen eye for the wonders of steampunk and its place in the world of fine art. He comments that, "Steampunk has already influenced everything from product design to fine art and fashion." To which I want to make a resounding clap of hands! Jules Verne would be so amazed and joyful to see what his imagination wrought, and how man has taken it to the next steps and beyond. In this book we see the beautiful, clean line and artistic aesthetic of physical scientific materials juxtaposed with natural products and man-made materials such as refined leather and rubber. I'm only touching the surface when I give that much description because the clocks, lamps, laptops and other pieces shown in this exhibit will sit you back in your seat, spellbound and gaping. This book may answer that question we had as children; why would someone want to be a "Cat Burglar?" Why in this case is because the amazing, inventive gadgets made into works of art are so superior and elegant they are incomparable treasures! When you peruse this book, it will take you out of the 21st century and place you someplace else, and you'll want to don brass, iron, leather, jewels, stone, crystals and time-pieces...you'll want to be wound up in a time machine and a steampunk gizmo for a trip. You'll wish you'd been at this amazing display of formidable artists' designs. You can find a trailer of this book on YouTube with some of the artworks. Deb

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ron Pratt

    “Steampunk creations may be mechanical, sculptural, or purely decorative. The designs may be practical or completely fanciful. Whatever the application, the art celebrates a time when new technology was produced, not by large corporations, but by talented and independent artisans and inventors.” -Art Donovan This is a beautiful book crammed full of Steampunk art, not paintings, fashion, or writing, but of constructions and contraptions created by a wide variety of artists to celebrate the Steampu “Steampunk creations may be mechanical, sculptural, or purely decorative. The designs may be practical or completely fanciful. Whatever the application, the art celebrates a time when new technology was produced, not by large corporations, but by talented and independent artisans and inventors.” -Art Donovan This is a beautiful book crammed full of Steampunk art, not paintings, fashion, or writing, but of constructions and contraptions created by a wide variety of artists to celebrate the Steampunk artistic ideal. This book celebrates the first-ever museum exhibition of Steampunk art, held at the Museum of the History of Science, Oxford University, 2010. I’ll admit I’ve been a fan of Steampunk long before I knew the term. As child, I was fascinated by Jules Verne and Walt Disney’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. The idea of science from the past, more advanced that what we have today, has always held great interest and great promise for what we might be able to accomplish in our lifetime. I love the handmade, yet so advanced, feel of Steampunk – as if anyone of us really could envision and build a time machine or moon rocket in our own basement or Victorian garden. Like many books of this type, it makes me want to dig around through all my neglected boxes, drawers, and cupboards for forgotten gears and goggles, bits and pieces, stuff and nonsense, and plug in my trusty glue gun to begin creating my own Steampunk contraptions. But, somehow, theirs always turn out better than mine. It is worth noting that there is both a first and second edition book of this book available. Naturally, I recommend the expanded second edition which includes more than 50 addition pages and several additional artists. Both first and second editions of this book were obtained through my local public library. No compensation promised or received.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ron Pratt

    “Steampunk creations may be mechanical, sculptural, or purely decorative. The designs may be practical or completely fanciful. Whatever the application, the art celebrates a time when new technology was produced, not by large corporations, but by talented and independent artisans and inventors.” -Art Donovan This is a beautiful book crammed full of Steampunk art, not paintings, fashion, or writing, but of constructions and contraptions created by a wide variety of artists to celebrate the Steampu “Steampunk creations may be mechanical, sculptural, or purely decorative. The designs may be practical or completely fanciful. Whatever the application, the art celebrates a time when new technology was produced, not by large corporations, but by talented and independent artisans and inventors.” -Art Donovan This is a beautiful book crammed full of Steampunk art, not paintings, fashion, or writing, but of constructions and contraptions created by a wide variety of artists to celebrate the Steampunk artistic ideal. This book celebrates the first-ever museum exhibition of Steampunk art, held at the Museum of the History of Science, Oxford University, 2010. I’ll admit I’ve been a fan of Steampunk long before I knew the term. As child, I was fascinated by Jules Verne and Walt Disney’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. The idea of science from the past, more advanced that what we have today, has always held great interest and great promise for what we might be able to accomplish in our lifetime. I love the handmade, yet so advanced, feel of Steampunk – as if anyone of us really could envision and build a time machine or moon rocket in our own basement or Victorian garden. Like many books of this type, it makes me want to dig around through all my neglected boxes, drawers, and cupboards for forgotten gears and goggles, bits and pieces, stuff and nonsense, and plug in my trusty glue gun to begin creating my own Steampunk contraptions. But, somehow, theirs always turn out better than mine. It is worth noting that there is both a first and second edition book of this book available. Naturally, I recommend the expanded second edition which includes more than 50 addition pages and several additional artists. Both first and second editions of this book were obtained through my local public library. No compensation promised or received.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Review is based on an electronic viewing Overall A beautiful introduction to the world of steampunk, with nice art, limited text and good, basic information. While not ideal for someone already deeply in the world of steampunk, this book will definitely give some ideas to the beginning dabbler, as well as explain some of the history and concepts behind streampunk. A visually appealing work, this definitely would be worth having sitting on the coffee table. If nothing else, it will strike up conver Review is based on an electronic viewing Overall A beautiful introduction to the world of steampunk, with nice art, limited text and good, basic information. While not ideal for someone already deeply in the world of steampunk, this book will definitely give some ideas to the beginning dabbler, as well as explain some of the history and concepts behind streampunk. A visually appealing work, this definitely would be worth having sitting on the coffee table. If nothing else, it will strike up conversation. Strengths Beautiful. There is some truly beautiful art represented on these pages, ranging from clothing to tools to just works of art (although they are all art in their own way). Ideas. While this book primarily provides ideas of what steampunk culture is, it also is a nice look at different elements of the culture for those already involved, possibly offering fresh ideas for people who want to try something a little different with their own steampunk style. Minimal words. While there are captions, descriptions, and some cute stories, as well as some background to both steampunk and the exhibition which this book represents, for the most part the art is left to speak for itself, letting the beauty stand on its own without being bogged down by unnecessary information. Weaknesses Not necessarily a weakness, but this is definitely angled for people just getting into steampunk, or it's meant to educate and draw people into the fold. While the perks definitely outnumber the drawbacks, aside from purely aesthetic reasons to get this, hardcore steampunk people may not get as much out of it. Be sure to check out my other reviews on my blog.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stacey O'Neale

    The Art of Steampunk seeks to celebrate the world of Steampunk: a world filled with beauty and innovation. A world in which steam power and technology intertwine to create machines that are not only functional and practical, but unique and striking. Inside, you will find the fantastical and stunning artwork of Steampunk artists from around the world. The 17 artists featured on these pages, among the frontrunners of the Steampunk genre, have had their work displayed at an exhibition at The Museum The Art of Steampunk seeks to celebrate the world of Steampunk: a world filled with beauty and innovation. A world in which steam power and technology intertwine to create machines that are not only functional and practical, but unique and striking. Inside, you will find the fantastical and stunning artwork of Steampunk artists from around the world. The 17 artists featured on these pages, among the frontrunners of the Steampunk genre, have had their work displayed at an exhibition at The Museum of History of Science at the University of Oxford, UK and have attracted the media attention of BoingBoing, one of the world’s largest blogs. Their artwork consists of everything from clocks and watches to light fixtures and jewelry, but every piece demonstrates hours of painstaking work and devotion from its creator. You will find that the artists themselves are just as unique and colorful as their masterpieces. Fully embracing Steampunk ideology, many have adopted a Victorian alter ego—a mad scientist persona to match the complicated intricacies of their artwork. The Art of Steampunk brings the vision of the Steampunk artist alive on the page, providing a unique insight into the captivating and dynamic world of a vastly underground genre. I really enjoyed this beautiful book. At first, you get a steampunk 101 of the genre. They cover many topics having to do with the history and modern day appeal. The artwork is beautiful and you get to know the artists who created it. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who'd like to know more about the steampunk genre or someone who already enjoys it and wants to view some of the best artwork around.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    The Art of Steampunk by Art Donovan (August 2011, Fox Chapel Publishing) is a window into a wonderfully creative genre of art today—steampunk. This genre includes clocks and sculpture, costumes, jewelry and artifacts, technology and weaponry, sometimes for use, sometimes to decorate an imaginary landscape or character. Interest in steampunk is growing in the entertainment world and it’s not hard to see why when you view the output of the visionary minds focusing here. The artist author curated an The Art of Steampunk by Art Donovan (August 2011, Fox Chapel Publishing) is a window into a wonderfully creative genre of art today—steampunk. This genre includes clocks and sculpture, costumes, jewelry and artifacts, technology and weaponry, sometimes for use, sometimes to decorate an imaginary landscape or character. Interest in steampunk is growing in the entertainment world and it’s not hard to see why when you view the output of the visionary minds focusing here. The artist author curated an exhibit at the Museum of the History of Science at Oxford University over 2009-2010 and this book is a documentation of seventeen artists’ pieces. The first exhibit of steampunk art, it legitimatized this wildly popular fringe style, normally based on fantasy nineteenth-century Britain technology, art and world view, though from an outsider perspective. Popular items such as goggles and airships are on display, but the variety is wide. One of my favorite parts of this book was the artist photos in each individual section. They framed the point of view of the artists beautifully. If you are new to steampunk, this book provides a good primer as to what it is. If you are an artist looking for inspiration, the photographs will have your juices flowing. Even before seeing this upcoming title, I had become interested in this field through the literary endeavors in it, and I’m thrilled to see such high quality, inspirational material to fuel my writer’s imagination.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alessandra

    This book is really a catalogue for an art exhibit, called simply "Steampunk," at Oxford University's Museum of the History of Science from October 2009 through February 2010. Seventeen artists and the curator, Art Donovan, exhibited various devices, contraptions, and works of art. The director of the museum charmingly talks of how the exhibit gave visitors new appreciation for actual Victorian scientific devices in the collections. The catalogue lists the eighteen artists and gives each one seve This book is really a catalogue for an art exhibit, called simply "Steampunk," at Oxford University's Museum of the History of Science from October 2009 through February 2010. Seventeen artists and the curator, Art Donovan, exhibited various devices, contraptions, and works of art. The director of the museum charmingly talks of how the exhibit gave visitors new appreciation for actual Victorian scientific devices in the collections. The catalogue lists the eighteen artists and gives each one several full-color pages showing his or her artworks. The photography is lovingly done. It is less like a standard exhibition catalogue, which would have very straightforward photographs of the artworks and highly detailed descriptions, and more like a showcase. This is a catalogue to admire the artworks rather than fully comprehend them. The art is detailed and carefully crafted, ranging from lace jewellery to brass and wood computers and leather bird-shaped gas-masks. It is quite lovely, and shows both the range and the common themes of the steampunk subculture. Unfortunately, this exhibit conforms to a regrettable statistic common in the arts world. Of eighteen artists (counting Mr. Donovan), only two, Amanda Scrivener and Molly Friedrich, are women. It can't be because there aren't women steampunk artists. It's disappointing. But that's really the only disappointment in this handsome little guide.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I got the book as an advanced copy from Netgalley. This book is the result of a Steampunk exhibition at Oxford University's Museum of the History of Science, which ran from October 2009 - Feb 2010, and was curated by the author (who also designs Steampunk light fixtures). While the exhibit focused on the Steampunk art and the artists that created them, it also featured "original Victorian and Edwardian instruments and machines that exemplified the roots of Steampunk art" (pg 19). Despite the pop I got the book as an advanced copy from Netgalley. This book is the result of a Steampunk exhibition at Oxford University's Museum of the History of Science, which ran from October 2009 - Feb 2010, and was curated by the author (who also designs Steampunk light fixtures). While the exhibit focused on the Steampunk art and the artists that created them, it also featured "original Victorian and Edwardian instruments and machines that exemplified the roots of Steampunk art" (pg 19). Despite the popularity of Steampunk literature and fashion etc, this museum exhibit was the first of its kind. I found it interesting that there weren't only Steampunk clothes and jewelry, but also car motors and engines. The book featured "Steampunk 101," which breaks down the term, what it is, where it comes from and how sci-fi fits in with the term. This section explains the purpose of gears and goggles, and the appeal of Steampunk. While I did not know any of the artists, I found their work fascinating and their creator names amusing. I loved the Shiva Mandala on page 14 & 15, the Beholder Robot Sculpture on pg 50, Lunar Period on pg 66, The Lady Raygun on pg 72, Datamancer Ergo Keyboard on pg 104, Datamancer Steampunk Laptop on pg 108, and the Flying Civil Servant on pg 115. Recommended for ages 12+, five stars.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Scarlett

    Originally posted on my blog here. I love the steampunk genre. Books, movies, pictures, costumes, I avidly follow it all. It was nice that someone took this rapidly expanding genre and compiled a book showing some of the creative things that people have done with this idea. The creations in this book were elegant and worth looking at. I saw an earlier version of the manuscript and the final version is incomparable. The backgrounds really help tie things together and give an overall elegant feel t Originally posted on my blog here. I love the steampunk genre. Books, movies, pictures, costumes, I avidly follow it all. It was nice that someone took this rapidly expanding genre and compiled a book showing some of the creative things that people have done with this idea. The creations in this book were elegant and worth looking at. I saw an earlier version of the manuscript and the final version is incomparable. The backgrounds really help tie things together and give an overall elegant feel to the book. If I had to choose one word to describe this book, and it describes the steampunk genre as well, it would be FANTASTICAL. Reading through this book made me excited for steampunk again, so much so that I wish my location wasn’t so limited and that there were steampunk conventions that I could go to. Since I can’t however, reading through this book and looking at the detailed pictures and following up on the creators websites will have to suffice. Even if you are a long time fan or are new to the steampunk genre this is a great book to either fuel your passion or get you started. Well worth my time and enjoyment.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Charla Wilson

    The Art of Steampunk is rooted in the Aesthetics of Victorian Technology. Steampunk can be described as Victorian Sci fi because authors such as Jules Verne and H.G. Wells opened peoples imaginations like no one else had ever done before. But, it was not until the late 1980's that it got the name, "Steampunk". The term was used by K.W. Jeter during the Cyberpunk era to describe the stories written during the Victorian period, and it has stuck ever since. This Victorian period and the writing tha The Art of Steampunk is rooted in the Aesthetics of Victorian Technology. Steampunk can be described as Victorian Sci fi because authors such as Jules Verne and H.G. Wells opened peoples imaginations like no one else had ever done before. But, it was not until the late 1980's that it got the name, "Steampunk". The term was used by K.W. Jeter during the Cyberpunk era to describe the stories written during the Victorian period, and it has stuck ever since. This Victorian period and the writing that ocurred during that period has provided inspiration for artists of today. The inspiration for this book was due to a Steampunk exhibition at the University Museum of History and Science in the UK. This exhibition occurred because of Art Donovans encouragement for doing the exhibition and thank goodness he was persistant. Otherwise, these wonderful artists may have been overlooked. The artists that participated in the exhibition came from all over the world. For your viewing pleasure, please visit http://steampunkmuseumexhibition.blog... But beware, because this stuff will make you drool! Surely, after seeing this, you will become a fan of this Art! Please visit my blog for the full review! http://thehappytonic.blogspot.com

  30. 5 out of 5

    Steven R. McEvoy

    This book grew out of the exhibit that ran at the Museum of the History of Science at the University of Oxford, UK. It features the art and creations from 17 different artists. This book celebrates the variety, creativity and uniqueness of Steampunk. It brings to life creations from moves like The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and from books by authors like Cassandra Clare, Arthur Slade and many more. Artists Featured: Tom Banwell Art Donovan Molly "Prokshanks" Friedrich Kris Kuksi Rich Nagy "Data This book grew out of the exhibit that ran at the Museum of the History of Science at the University of Oxford, UK. It features the art and creations from 17 different artists. This book celebrates the variety, creativity and uniqueness of Steampunk. It brings to life creations from moves like The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and from books by authors like Cassandra Clare, Arthur Slade and many more. Artists Featured: Tom Banwell Art Donovan Molly "Prokshanks" Friedrich Kris Kuksi Rich Nagy "Datamancer" Jessee Newhouse Thomas Willeford Joey Marsocci "Dr. Grymm" Eric Freitas Stephan Halleux Daniel Proulx Haruo Suekichi James Richardson Brown Jos De Vink Mad Uncle Cliff Vianney Halter Herr Doktor This book will be a great hit with fans of the Steampunk movies or books. It will also be a fun coffee table book and conversation starter. Full of original and unique art work, it brings science fiction to life with a Victorian twist. Read the review on my blog Book Reviews and More.

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