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30 review

Tank Girl

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Tank Girl PDF, ePub eBook She’s back to wreck her own unique brand of havoc! From the depths of the outback she charges, astride her fabulous tank! Run for the Hills! It’s... Tank Girl! Join everybody’s favourite beer-swilling, chain-smoking, kangaroo-worrying lunatic as she blitzes her way through a dazzling array of bizarre adventures, including bounty hunting, delivering colostomy bags to Austral She’s back to wreck her own unique brand of havoc! From the depths of the outback she charges, astride her fabulous tank! Run for the Hills! It’s... Tank Girl! Join everybody’s favourite beer-swilling, chain-smoking, kangaroo-worrying lunatic as she blitzes her way through a dazzling array of bizarre adventures, including bounty hunting, delivering colostomy bags to Australian presidents, kangaroo boxing... and many more outrageous and mind-warping thrills! Marking the 20th anniversary of Tank Girl, with a new introduction from Alan Martin, and rarely seen material from Jamie Hewlett, this is the start of the ultimate collection. Presented for the first time, in chronological order and in glorious black and white - the way nature intended! Warning: Adults only!

30 review for Tank Girl

  1. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    The funny thing about Tank Girl -- well, there's lots of funny things, but one odd thing about reading it in a collected format -- is that the creators themselves say in the forward to the first book that they feel that the entire series is at its peak right here. I'd tend to agree with them. These early strips are the definition of lightning in a bottle -- so jam-packed with insanity, humor and violence that the panels literally spill over with dialogue, scribbled tangents and ridiculous ideas. The funny thing about Tank Girl -- well, there's lots of funny things, but one odd thing about reading it in a collected format -- is that the creators themselves say in the forward to the first book that they feel that the entire series is at its peak right here. I'd tend to agree with them. These early strips are the definition of lightning in a bottle -- so jam-packed with insanity, humor and violence that the panels literally spill over with dialogue, scribbled tangents and ridiculous ideas. The creators describe staying up for two days straight, passing pages back and forth to meet their deadlines until they didn't know what they were writing about and couldn't keep the details straight. And that, friends, is how you write Tank Girl. But the great thing is that you can pick up just this volume and get schooled on a major part of indie comics history, without committing to a huge series or wading through a newbie creator's early development on the way to the "good stuff." THIS is the good stuff, and while the amazing Jamie Hewlett's art commands center stage in later volumes, those later books are also a little too self-concious of their own wild antics, and lose some of what gives the book its magic. Basically, if you've heard of Tank Girl or seen the movie or just have an image in your mind of what a hero named Tank Girl would be like, and you think that someone else's vision couldn't possibly live up to the hilarity in your head -- this is one case where you're wrong. This book is more fun than anything you could possibly think it might be. But for God's sake, do the grunt work of tracking down the full-color edition. The black-and-white "remastered" reprints are newer and probably easier to find, but I cannot think of any reason on earth why you'd want them. Tank Girl is a nuclear explosion in sequential narrative form, and you deserve to see it right.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jess ❈Harbinger of Blood-Soaked Rainbows❈

    I HAD NO IDEA THIS WAS A COMIC BOOK!!!! GAH!!! I JUST DIED. Lori Petty is my queen.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    "Hot shot, sex pot!" What's Tank Girl about? "In issue one I bagged off with a kangaroo. In issue two I made President Hogan sh*t his pants. In issue three I'm hunted by some of Australia's nastiest bounty hunters!" How do I describe Tank Girl? Let's do some free association. Happy chaos. Anarchy. Anarchy in the UK. Not UK. Australia. Hot. Desert. Barren. Need cold drinks. Beer. So much beer. Pissed. Driving pissed and driving over people. Driving tanks off cliffs. Running from baddies. Bad hango "Hot shot, sex pot!" What's Tank Girl about? "In issue one I bagged off with a kangaroo. In issue two I made President Hogan sh*t his pants. In issue three I'm hunted by some of Australia's nastiest bounty hunters!" How do I describe Tank Girl? Let's do some free association. Happy chaos. Anarchy. Anarchy in the UK. Not UK. Australia. Hot. Desert. Barren. Need cold drinks. Beer. So much beer. Pissed. Driving pissed and driving over people. Driving tanks off cliffs. Running from baddies. Bad hangovers. Bad dreams. Dreaming and waking in bed with a kangaroo. Weird animals. Weird friends. Weird comics. Tank Girl is a free spirit. She loves to drink and party and and have fun. She likes to hang out and devise weird half ass plans and get in trouble and fight with and run from undesirables. More importantly, though, these very short comics operate on the writer's whim, much like free association. The plots are very thin and loose. Things just sort of happen. Lessons aren't always learned. Actually, I don't think lessons are ever learned. It's about the experience, the journey, not the destination. These comics represent the rejection of the system and social standards and even the rules of stories themselves: mostly plotless, but comedic, crass, sexual, riddled with typos, filled with random notes and pictures and creatures and quotes, poems and thoughts and rants, letters and lyrics, even the music listened to while creating the comics is listed, like notebooks of angsty clever teens. And...it's brilliant. Some of the lineup: Tank Girl. Jet Girl. Sub Girl. Stevie. Booga (the Kangaroo). Camp Koala. Mr. Precocious (the Mouse). Squeeky Toy Rat. Ben Green. And lastly, there's a cactus named Robert De Niro. Some quotes: "Curiosity killed the prat bozo!" "You're a guitar without strings. An angel without wings!" "Jesus H. Christ Mother of God, Mammary Madness!" "Now our super star Blane Shacklebottom talks about his new book, 'How to be a Boring Shithead!'" "Hot shot, sex pot!" "She is a throwback to the ancient days when women were built like cars." "She is the bottle feed daughter of the throw away age." "The toilet gargles on last nights tandoori." "As Venus rose from the waves all mankind bowed in awe of her beauty..." "And the quarterback is toast!" "One thing that has always disturbed me is the fact that people have two sets of clothes-a scruffy set for mucking about in and a smart set for going out in. I mean, do you change into a different person when you go somewhere "special"? No! You're still the same bumhole you were building that tree house this morning. So why dress different? Are we living in the Middle Ages? Are you all suckers for that sophistication crap they pump out on t.v.? Or do you lick the boots of those big men type wankers with lots of cash? If there's one thing I can't stand it's vanity, especially in blokes. I love my clothes." "Mmmh! Smells good Booga. I'll have eggs, tomatoes, bacon, sausage, corn on the cob, fried bread, baked beans, porridge, soup, egg fritters, toast and jam, ice cream, boiled carrots, potatoes, your mother's ass, and a huge mug of tea... ..pa-leez." My only concern for this zany homebrew of comic chaos is the black and white, at least in this version. I mean, I'm a 90s kid, my life has always been in color. And the artwork is so highly detailed, crazy detailed, that ironically the details melt together and become a wash of black and the lettering can be hard to read sometimes. Not always. It depends on the panel and what's happening. That's the trouble with only black. So if there was color to set things apart, embolden the details, shove the lettering into the quiet background, this comic would really sail among the best. This was a slow read for me simply because there is so much meat here. So take it slow.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Blythe

    3 1/2 stars This "remastered" version presents the Tank Girl series in its original black and white and in chronological order of when they first appeared. Tank Girl is the mutated child of Madonna and GI Joe, living in an apocalyptic Aussie outback with a few teenage mutant punk rock kangaroos thrown in. While the author and artist claim to have created this comic in rebellion against the pathos of MTV, the truth is Tank Girl could only have come out of that generation (late 80s, early 90s). It's 3 1/2 stars This "remastered" version presents the Tank Girl series in its original black and white and in chronological order of when they first appeared. Tank Girl is the mutated child of Madonna and GI Joe, living in an apocalyptic Aussie outback with a few teenage mutant punk rock kangaroos thrown in. While the author and artist claim to have created this comic in rebellion against the pathos of MTV, the truth is Tank Girl could only have come out of that generation (late 80s, early 90s). It's short episodic pieces, laced with pop culture and zany antics would have been right at home with the other animated shows appearing on that channel an others during that time period. It's all about spectacle and objectification an wackadoodle encounters. Many of the stories only barely make sense, if they even bother with sense at all, and there is little to no character development. Event flashes to event like a series of quick paced music videos (though there seems to be a tiny bit more cohesion toward the end of the book and you can see how the creators gained skill). The art is frantic and detailed, sometimes with so much going on its hard to know where to look, but it's fun to look at. Tank Girl is a representation of Girl Power as much as Spice Girls was (though more punk rock than pop rock), half sexist exploitation even as she presents power. Nameless, Tank Girl is only Tank Girl. She, like all the characters within the comic, is entirely one dimensional. Never growing or changing (except in appearance and clothing), she is exactly as advertised, a tank driving, chain smoking, kangaroo kissing crazy woman wearing little more than a black bra and a devil-may-care smile. Absolutely fearless and with no ambition, she faces each bizarre challenge with a grin on her face. Half the time she's so busy doing here own thing, she's oblivious to the threats around her and gets out of sticky situations as much by luck as by any apparent skill (which other than her fearlessness and recklessness, I'm not sure she has). In a sense, I love Tank Girl, because she allows me to live vicariously. I always wanted to be that person, with crazy dyed and wacky cut hair, adorned with chains and safety pins and vibrant colors, and sporting an I-don't-give-a-flying-f*ck-what-you think attitude. But I never had the courage and I still don't. She's fun and free of cares, which unfortunately means she leaves a slew of damage and death in her wake. There are never any consequences for this; Tank Girl lives in blissful chaos. That and the sexism are only minor concerns compared to how the black and aboriginal characters are handled. They are presented as caricatures, all with dreadlocks and big lips and often with tribal paint; one such character is a voodoo priest (even though that's not part of Australian Aboriginal culture as far as I'm aware), who actually says, "Ooga, ooga, ooga," while in the act of performing "magic." And it's just so racist. It doesn't happen often, but every time one of these caricatures appeared I cringed. *sigh* I like the idea of Tank Girl (and I even like the ridiculous movie adaptation), but I have a hell of a lot of reservations about aspects of it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Burton

    nybody who tells you a girl can't drive a tank should be run over and then drowned in cheap beer. Tank Girl kicks butt and doesn't take whiny prisoners. She and her other grrlfriends, Jet Girl and Subgirl, have one thing in mind: To have fun wreaking havoc across the desert. In the beginning....Tank Girl has a long, sorded history beginning with her two dads, Jaime Hewlett and Alan Martin.After plenty of cheap beer and not much else, they came up with our beloved doll of destruction, Tank Girl. And nybody who tells you a girl can't drive a tank should be run over and then drowned in cheap beer. Tank Girl kicks butt and doesn't take whiny prisoners. She and her other grrlfriends, Jet Girl and Subgirl, have one thing in mind: To have fun wreaking havoc across the desert. In the beginning....Tank Girl has a long, sorded history beginning with her two dads, Jaime Hewlett and Alan Martin.After plenty of cheap beer and not much else, they came up with our beloved doll of destruction, Tank Girl. And she debuted in the U.K. comic/music/fashion rag known as Deadline. As we all know, Tanky and friends had great success in the comic book world. Images of Tank Girl could be seen on shirts, skateboards and, of course, a true hipster would tattoo himself with a grinning Tank Girl. But like all great things, Hollywood came into the picture to mess things up royally.They forced poor Jamie and Alan to take truck-loads of money so directors who NEVER read the comic could turn it into an action flick. The REAL Tank Girl would have never given in...well...maybe she would if she could have some fun screwing everything up and making those Hollywood types mad. But as we both know, the movie just wasn't that great. The REAL Tanky wouldn't be into the Good VS. Evil fight. She just wants a decent can of beer, a good snog with her kangaroo boyfriend and a full tank of gas.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    Eh. I bought this for my dude, who was a big fan of the Tank Girl movie, and picked it up last night. Not my cup of tea. I found the artwork confusing and most of the in-jokes tired (although they were probably fresh when they were written.) So, wev. I probably won't read any more. But can I just digress here a minute to say that I don't get it when people go on about how Tank Girl is so feminist? Evidently violent and not prissy makes one feminist. You know, I get it. It's really enjoyable to s Eh. I bought this for my dude, who was a big fan of the Tank Girl movie, and picked it up last night. Not my cup of tea. I found the artwork confusing and most of the in-jokes tired (although they were probably fresh when they were written.) So, wev. I probably won't read any more. But can I just digress here a minute to say that I don't get it when people go on about how Tank Girl is so feminist? Evidently violent and not prissy makes one feminist. You know, I get it. It's really enjoyable to see a character that's lewd, crude, and rude instead of a girly-girl, especially if girly-girls are all you see. But, and this is the same problem with that dumb movie Sucker Punch, women kicking ass is not default feminism. I mean, both this and Sucker Punch and a whole bunch of other crap I could name are basically male fantasies. Enjoy them if you want, but please don't tell me how feminist they are. You want a rude, crude, violent feminist? Try Hothead Paisan.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Aamil Syed

    How would you like a ball busting, head chopping, tank driving bitchy diva who has serious fun while doing it all? Bring it on, I hear you say? Well, that and a lot, lot more than that is what Tank girl is all about. Tank Girl is an outlaw living in the Australian Outback who hangs out with her boyfriend, a mutant Kangaroo; her best friend, a junkie Aborigine; a stuffed toy Koala bear who hasn't come to terms with his sexual orientation and a horny squeaky toy rat. And if you're not convinced tha How would you like a ball busting, head chopping, tank driving bitchy diva who has serious fun while doing it all? Bring it on, I hear you say? Well, that and a lot, lot more than that is what Tank girl is all about. Tank Girl is an outlaw living in the Australian Outback who hangs out with her boyfriend, a mutant Kangaroo; her best friend, a junkie Aborigine; a stuffed toy Koala bear who hasn't come to terms with his sexual orientation and a horny squeaky toy rat. And if you're not convinced that Tank girl (with her friends, Jet Girl and Sub Girl) is a resounding anti-establishment slap on the face of all civilization, then you deserve to be strapped between two nuclear warheads and violently murdered! (just kidding) The comic creators have stopped at nothing to create a bald anti-heroine who oozes sexual confidence, who thinks nothing of rules of engagement and whose idea of fun is to wreak havoc on everything around. With her Tank. She crushes, stomps and blasts her way to arrive in style and she has a permanent look of 'fuck you all, I don't give a shit!' on her face. The comic is overflowing with far too many pop culture references, fantastically amazing artwork, superb attention to detail and meta-humor. I just LOVED the feel that I got while reading it; it was like getting a dose of adrenaline and endorphin, packed in little pills of viagra! (sorry, couldn't think of a better way to describe it) This is the closest I've come to falling in love with a comic book character, but I'm sure that she wouldn't care a bit for that, so I've decided to worship her instead. There's insanity, there's humor, there's violence and then, there's Tank Girl! All hail Tank Girl! Don't think too much, just go and read this comic! You MUST! Meanwhile, here are some sequences from the comic for those who can't wait. Forty-third book reviewed as part of the 130 Challenge | Read (this is the 100th post on my blog!) on my blog

  8. 5 out of 5

    Erin Cataldi

    I was inspired to read this ridiculousness after my friend Tim showed me the movie version. It sparked my interest and I had to know more about this beer swilling, kangaroo screwing, tank loving, she devil. The comics did not disappoint. I don't know how I made it this far into my life never having heard of Tank Girl. She's ridiculous and nearly defies definition. She's the most badass chick in Australia and she kicks butt and takes names second. She lives for the moment and has no agenda beyond I was inspired to read this ridiculousness after my friend Tim showed me the movie version. It sparked my interest and I had to know more about this beer swilling, kangaroo screwing, tank loving, she devil. The comics did not disappoint. I don't know how I made it this far into my life never having heard of Tank Girl. She's ridiculous and nearly defies definition. She's the most badass chick in Australia and she kicks butt and takes names second. She lives for the moment and has no agenda beyond her own personal enjoyment. I will definitely be checking out the rest of the comics. The characters are bat shit insane, the story line is barely follow-able, and the inside jokes and little notes are a real treat. Soo glad I got introduced to Tank Girl. Better late than never!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Fetters

    "Suck on this, Fart Face" [image error] When I die and come back, Tank Girl is who I'll be reincarnated as. Talk about a badass girl who fights just for shits and giggles. That's what we shall call.... my hero. The art is shocking to the human eye as it seems to go in every single direction, which goes for the storyline as well. But it doesn't seem to take away from any of it. TG's travels are read almost like they have been put together by Hunter S. Thompson and Tank Girl is Fear and Loathing.

  10. 5 out of 5

    D.M.

    I was recently reading Grant Morrison's Supergods, and thinking when he was eulogising Tank Girl that I wouldn't mind rereading those stories (I'd been on the TG bandwagon in the early 90s, but don't actually own any now for reasons to be discussed later...). By complete coincidence (although if I were Grant Morrison I'd probably presume this was because my chakras had gotten wrapped around my mandala or some other bastardisation of eastern philosophy, it really was just a coincidence), a few da I was recently reading Grant Morrison's Supergods, and thinking when he was eulogising Tank Girl that I wouldn't mind rereading those stories (I'd been on the TG bandwagon in the early 90s, but don't actually own any now for reasons to be discussed later...). By complete coincidence (although if I were Grant Morrison I'd probably presume this was because my chakras had gotten wrapped around my mandala or some other bastardisation of eastern philosophy, it really was just a coincidence), a few days later our excellent little local library had the first three volumes of this remastered series collection! Way back in the early 90s, in the thick of the Dawn of New Comics, Tank Girl barrelled onto the scene like a number of other violent, irreverent, black and white, independently produced comics (Milk and Cheese springs immediately to mind). Jamie Hewlett was unmistakeably talented and his every panel was a riotous feast for the eyes; Alan Martin (whose contribution appears practically marginal) had a penchant for making the most incomprehensible and ridiculous madcap adventures appear to be part of a greater complete narrative. While Hewlett got better with the years, regrettably Tank Girl did not and I lost interest after the second Dark Horse mini-series (and even eventually got rid of those). What was fun and refreshing at the start turned out to be a wearying one-trick pony show only a few years later. This collection does nothing to change that perception: we start with idiotic zaniness, and continue through idiotic zaniness to finally finish with (you guessed it!) idiotic zaniness. I can only imagine that Hewlett's constantly new, always improving and thoroughly engrossing super-pop art is what kept this one-note character going for enough material to fill the six books of the current series of reprints. Time will tell if there's anything more to be gleaned from the series as I read the next two books, but my hopes are not high. If all I expect is mindless mayhem, Tank Girl will have to go out of her way to disappoint. This edition collects early Deadline strips, assorted pin-ups (of undetermined provenance), the first Dark Horse mini-series' covers (and thumbnails of the appropriate Deadline covers) in full colour and adds an interesting and entertaining intro from Alan Martin, illustrated with photos, early art and influential images.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Meg Powers

    I had been putting off reading Tank Girl for a long time. My disinterest was probably a product of poor associations, either from watching the movie or dealing with annoying teen-punks who loved the comic. Well, I've exhausted my school library's comic collection, and the Jamie Hewlett art looked appealing, so what the hell. The art and lettering is great-the stories and dialogue, not so much. Each page is beautiful to look at, with a lot of anarchic paneling,psychedelic new-wavey aboriginal mot I had been putting off reading Tank Girl for a long time. My disinterest was probably a product of poor associations, either from watching the movie or dealing with annoying teen-punks who loved the comic. Well, I've exhausted my school library's comic collection, and the Jamie Hewlett art looked appealing, so what the hell. The art and lettering is great-the stories and dialogue, not so much. Each page is beautiful to look at, with a lot of anarchic paneling,psychedelic new-wavey aboriginal motifs, cool punk aesthetics, and a lot of outfits I would totally wear. Hewlett also manages to render a mutant punk kangaroo that doesn't come across as embarrassingly furry-fetishistic,unlike a lot of other anthropomorphic comic characters (I'm looking at you, Omaha), in spite of its inter-species sexual relationship with Tank Girl. These were re-printed in color for Dark Horse, and I would love to see it in original black and white. The lettering is gritty and fits the punk aesthetic really well. The actual writing gets too chaotic, however. A lot of the slang is confusing, the action and motivations behind the characters are confusing (aside from Tank Girl herself-her motivation is pretty consistently getting plastered), the dialogue is a crazy mess (partly because the punctuation is awful) and is cluttered with a ton of references that go way over my head. The comic seems to be a big inside joke for the creators and their friends. There are little messages scrawled over all the panels that have nothing to do with the action and get annoying. I am curious to read later Tank Girl comics, which feature different writers and artists; I'm sure the inside-joke quality dissipates by that point. There is also a lot of fourth-wall-breakage, something I am never a fan of. Also, I am a pretty crusty girl, fond of gross-outs and general scuzziness, but sometimes Tank Girl's tendencies just kinda ick me out. However, if you want to see panels of hot skinhead babes making out with kangaroos,farting, and taking craps, this is the comic for you! In spite of my ambivalence towards Tank Girl, I am probably going to read more, even if just for the art.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Trina

    So .... this was different. My reasoning for reading the series was that I am one of the few people who enjoyed Tank Girl the movie but felt it was missing something. I wanted to get the rest of the story and the graphic novel seemed to be the place to scratch that itch. After struggling through the first Tank Girl graphic novel ..... I have hives! It was a disjointed mess of ideas, musings, scary dreams, and a lot of 'what ifs'. I think the connotation of "graphic novel" feed into the difficult So .... this was different. My reasoning for reading the series was that I am one of the few people who enjoyed Tank Girl the movie but felt it was missing something. I wanted to get the rest of the story and the graphic novel seemed to be the place to scratch that itch. After struggling through the first Tank Girl graphic novel ..... I have hives! It was a disjointed mess of ideas, musings, scary dreams, and a lot of 'what ifs'. I think the connotation of "graphic novel" feed into the difficulty I had with the book. Novel indicates (at least in my mind) a cohesive story with a beginning, middle and end. Whether it has graphics or not makes no difference. Tank Girl was not cohesive in anyway. I think I would have appreciated it more back in the day when it was first published in the 80's in Deadline magazine. I would not have been expecting a linear story and would have just enjoyed it for what it was. I did some research and the later novels have more of a storyline that one can follow so I think I will soldier on (ha ha)and see if Tank Girl the Graphic Novel wins a place in my heart.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    My 4 star rating is a reflection of two separate things: 5 stars for the art and 3 stars for the writing and storyline. In this collection we meet Tank Girl, who crashes through the post-apocalyptic Australian outback in her tank, with her hot kangaroo boyfriend and other assorted weirdos. We also meet her counterparts, Jet Girl and Sub Girl. This comic is violent, irreverent, and full of beer. I’ve fallen in love with Hewlett’s drawing style, which you may recognize from Gorillaz album covers. My 4 star rating is a reflection of two separate things: 5 stars for the art and 3 stars for the writing and storyline. In this collection we meet Tank Girl, who crashes through the post-apocalyptic Australian outback in her tank, with her hot kangaroo boyfriend and other assorted weirdos. We also meet her counterparts, Jet Girl and Sub Girl. This comic is violent, irreverent, and full of beer. I’ve fallen in love with Hewlett’s drawing style, which you may recognize from Gorillaz album covers. It was a picture of TG and Booga that I saw online that alerted me to this series’ existence in the first place. The amount of detail in every spread was great, and I often slowed my reading to check out the intricacies of an article of clothing. Some of the pages also had excellent composition. Dialogue is not exactly erudite and not entirely PC, but I’m able to acknowledge that and enjoy it anyway. Heavily referential and meta-- the margins are full of shoutouts to friends, references to 80s music culture, and sometimes the author's aside comments directly at a character. I will be ordering the next two collections on Amazon since they're hard to find in libraries in LA.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeneé

    This is probably one of the most wacky things I've ever read, I can understand why it has a cult following. If you are looking for a graphic novel with good art and a compelling story, this is not for you! The drawing is messy and non-consistent, the story doesn't make any sense and follows zero order or continuity, it's crude and rude, and it is extremely hard to read. But that's what makes it so awesome. This is not a book to sit down and enjoy, it's a novelty, it's fun and light (in the heavie This is probably one of the most wacky things I've ever read, I can understand why it has a cult following. If you are looking for a graphic novel with good art and a compelling story, this is not for you! The drawing is messy and non-consistent, the story doesn't make any sense and follows zero order or continuity, it's crude and rude, and it is extremely hard to read. But that's what makes it so awesome. This is not a book to sit down and enjoy, it's a novelty, it's fun and light (in the heaviest way possible). I fell in love with Tank Girl because of the '90s movie so decided to finally read the comics and it's very different and I must admit I like what they did with the movie much more. But these comics are extremely unique, unlike anything I've ever seen before. If you enjoy bad ass chicks who don't give a f*** about what you think and does what she wants, including dating a kangaroo man, then this is for you!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Raj

    I came to this after very much enjoying the film adaptation of Tank Girl. This volume collects the first 15 strips of Hewlett and Martin's very, very strange comic. Unfortunately, I must confess to not particularly enjoying much of it. As I say, it's very strange, sometimes non-linear, irreverent and just a little too bonkers for my tastes. There's little continuity between stories, and the whole thing of being on the run from the military just seems to fizzle out by the end. In saying that, ther I came to this after very much enjoying the film adaptation of Tank Girl. This volume collects the first 15 strips of Hewlett and Martin's very, very strange comic. Unfortunately, I must confess to not particularly enjoying much of it. As I say, it's very strange, sometimes non-linear, irreverent and just a little too bonkers for my tastes. There's little continuity between stories, and the whole thing of being on the run from the military just seems to fizzle out by the end. In saying that, there were a couple of stories that I enjoyed: the Italian Job spoof was fun, as was the one about God's dressing gown. The later stories weaved in some Australian Aborigine mythology which was interesting and it would have been nice to see more of that. An interesting read, but not one that I'd re-read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    Tank Girl, the character, is a lot of fun. I can see a legitimate criticism of her being the sort of "Geek Ideal" strong, sexy woman, but I didn't really feel that. She seemed like a perfect inhabitant for the world in which she lived. The fact that it seems like she really chose to live in that kind of world makes it make all the more sense. The ancillary characters haven't gotten a huge amount of page time yet, so it's a bit harder to judge them. They seem fun though. Booga's gotten the most t Tank Girl, the character, is a lot of fun. I can see a legitimate criticism of her being the sort of "Geek Ideal" strong, sexy woman, but I didn't really feel that. She seemed like a perfect inhabitant for the world in which she lived. The fact that it seems like she really chose to live in that kind of world makes it make all the more sense. The ancillary characters haven't gotten a huge amount of page time yet, so it's a bit harder to judge them. They seem fun though. Booga's gotten the most time and he's a lot of fun. His relationship with Tank Girl also undermines the "Geek Ideal" image. The art is a lot of fun. I like the Punk image of the world.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    So Tank Girl loves drinking beer and screwing kangaroos and generally just blowing things up. That's fine, but overall seems mostly crass and definitely a weird perversion of male fantasy. This is just the first volume, so maybe she develops into something more over time...In addition, the artwork was a bit hard to follow. Almost every story is action-packed, so I guess that's why some images seem unclear. I preferred the larger, less images, and I am aware that overall this review makes me seem So Tank Girl loves drinking beer and screwing kangaroos and generally just blowing things up. That's fine, but overall seems mostly crass and definitely a weird perversion of male fantasy. This is just the first volume, so maybe she develops into something more over time...In addition, the artwork was a bit hard to follow. Almost every story is action-packed, so I guess that's why some images seem unclear. I preferred the larger, less images, and I am aware that overall this review makes me seem like a bit of a prude. Oh well.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Paul Michaels

    Worth reading solely for Jamie Hewlett's early artwork. The story is an absolute mess and all of the jokes are based on 80's pop culture that (if you're British) you'll struggle to remember or (if you're American) you'll be completely lost with. "Who was Mike Smith again?" ... off to Wikipedia again.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ghostcat

    I finally discovered this masterpiece in punk-art and it was exactly what I expected, crazy, funny, delirious, epic, alternative and full of details, with amazing drawings. Can't wait to read the next volumes!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shari-amor

    I loved the movie. She's even more awesome in the comics. Most definitely want to read more.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hilary Martin

    Tank Girl is the hero we deserve (whether we like it or not).

  22. 5 out of 5

    robomatey

    best old school comic ever. ever! they have tom waits as the devil!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Valorie

    Tank Girl is hard to describe. She is utterly insane and lives in a post-apocalyptic world consisting of talking kangaroos, villains, and yes, her giant tank. The good thing about Tank Girl is, number one, she doesn’t care what people think. Number two she is fearless. Number three? Well, her fashion sense in amazing. The back describes Tank Girl as “an ignorant, beer-swilling, bestial skinhead [who becomes] an ignorant, beer-swilling, bestial blonde in a tank.” What’s more to love? Volume 1 of Tank Girl is hard to describe. She is utterly insane and lives in a post-apocalyptic world consisting of talking kangaroos, villains, and yes, her giant tank. The good thing about Tank Girl is, number one, she doesn’t care what people think. Number two she is fearless. Number three? Well, her fashion sense in amazing. The back describes Tank Girl as “an ignorant, beer-swilling, bestial skinhead [who becomes] an ignorant, beer-swilling, bestial blonde in a tank.” What’s more to love? Volume 1 of Tank Girl encompasses 15 issues ranging from October 1988 to February 1990. The comics are utterly, but purposefully, non Sequitur and it’s beautiful. I read through many panels thinking, “I don’t know what is going on but I love it.” A woman like tank girl naturally has a lot of enemies. Or makes enemies along the way. Besides Booga, a trusted Kangaroo companion. Things don’t always come out the way Tank Girl plans, but she always comes out the insane victor at the end. It’s hard to defeat a woman who is, as I said, utterly insane and possesses a tank. There are some really good features to the anthology. I particularly liked the cut out Tank Girl paper doll. It comes complete with uni-cycle and flask of coffee. The end also features a few pages of the original color covers of a few issues. I love it when anthologies include the covers—it gives a greater sense of what the comic looked like when it came out and it feels you are truly reading the comics as pieces and not as one whole massive storyline.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jewel

    I'm not the biggest fan of the art style, but the story is hilarious. I want to know more about Jet and Sub girl.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Art the Turtle of Amazing Girth

    Not really my thing, but I do get the appeal. Tank Girl, a bad ass in a tank, who dates kangaroos and drinks beer. She has hairbrained adventures and missions of a sort. She's kind of hot, and the book flirts with showing just a bit too much but never crosses the line, not really. Like I said, not quite my jam, but it was #87 in my top 100 graphic novels of all time list, sooo. 2.5 rounded up for making me laugh out loud a few times.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeane

    I really want to give it 5-stars and first reading the comics I totally did, but as the comics went on they lost any sort of story arch, and it got very weird. So first half 5 stars, second half 3 stars= 4 stars

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Tank Girl should have been in my life probably from birth, but somehow I didn't see the movie until about a year ago, and just got around to making my way through the comics. It's a post-apocalypse tale in the style of Mad Max: lots of loosely-connected tales with an 80s punk aesthetic about zooming around the Australian wilderness in a trademark vehicle with few connections to others, giving zero fucks. They could even be in the same universe. Tank Girl, though, is spastic, spontaneous, and tho Tank Girl should have been in my life probably from birth, but somehow I didn't see the movie until about a year ago, and just got around to making my way through the comics. It's a post-apocalypse tale in the style of Mad Max: lots of loosely-connected tales with an 80s punk aesthetic about zooming around the Australian wilderness in a trademark vehicle with few connections to others, giving zero fucks. They could even be in the same universe. Tank Girl, though, is spastic, spontaneous, and thoughtless where Max is deliberate and methodical, always with one eye toward the future. Tank Girl is also much more lighthearted; whether it's a warehouse full of beer, Tank Girl's life, or the whole world at stake, you know that somehow she'll pull through. It makes both the movie and the comics incredibly fun to experience. Tank Girl, Volume 1 is a collection of the first several runs of Tank Girl, accompanied by commentary from the authors that frame Tank Girl's origins and development. I'm probably in the minority on this, but sometimes I wish all books came with a retrospective letter from the author (or an informed editor) that give some context or history for the work. In this case, the foreward gave me notice of the various inspirations for Tank Girl, told me how the character developed to the point where she got her own story, and discussed the styles of each of the creators, which allowed me to trace various artists' and writers' contributions. For the most part in Volume 1, each issue was its own, self-contained story. Tank Girl fucks up a rare mission from what I presume is the post-apocalyptic Australian government in the first story, liberates a warehouse where some cronies are stockpiling her favorite brand of beer in another, and (possibly my favorite) teams up with her best friends Jet Girl and Sub Girl for a birthday bash in yet another. We see a lot of Booga, her on-and-off fuckbuddy/boyfriend. One of the most striking stories is one that has little Tank Girl in it at all; she appears at the end, as a mythic figure of liberation. And another (again, maybe my favorite) where her teddy bear is ruined and they have to retrieve another from the store. The artwork develops throughout, since these are the first several issues, but from start to finish it's a blast. There isn't an inch of wasted space on the page, everything is full of in-your-face bold colors or fantastic world-building detail. I'm a sucker for comics that flesh out their world by paying close attention to their scenery and details - adding in tiny elements that don't just add visual interest but convey something about the world, about the characters. And that's something the artists do here wonderfully. I also just love Tank Girl. I love her kickass style. I love her foul language. I love the design of Tank Girl, unabashedly female and not here for the male gaze; there were very few moments where I was uncomfortable with the physical portrayal of the female body, which is rare for comics of any era. She's sexual, voraciously and scarily. I love that in some scenes her face reminds me so strikingly of my sister that I do a double-take. I love her combat boots and her stupidly awesome hair. The world-building and storytelling here is interesting to me, as someone who came from the movie first. In the film, it's clearly a post-apocalyptic scenario. Here, amidst all the chaos of Tank Girl's life, it's hard to tell exactly what is happening. A gang can control the production and release of a brand of beer, but Tank Girl clearly gets orders from someone military. There's still media and government. But I love that things are left unclear; the patchwork nature of the story here, where you get bits and pieces of sometimes clearly contradictory information as-needed for whatever story is happening, is something quintessentially Tank Girl. It's as if we're seeing the world through Tank Girl's eyes, regardless of how the world actually is, she only pays attention to what is relevant at that moment. I'm eager to read the rest in this set - hopefully, they're all as rewarding and entertaining a read as this.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Delia

    This was a lot of fun to read, even though I had really no idea what to expect. It seems (to me, anyway) that people either adore Tank Girl or have no idea what that is. I personally found Tank Girl to be ridiculously funny, but a spontaneous, beer-guzzling, kangraroo-loving, cursing skinhead from the outback who isn't afraid to kick some ass may not be everyone's cup of tea.

  29. 5 out of 5

    The_Mad_Swede

    Naturally, I was aware of the existence of British cult comic Tank Girl by artist Jamie Hewlett and writer Alan Martin as a pop cultural phenomenon long before I ever picked up this volume, but I had not read any of the material (not even the much later Pete Milligan stuff that I may or may not yet track down and read – we will have to see about that). This black and white (as originally published) volume covers the first "yearish" worth of Tank Girl material, and is the first of a series. These Naturally, I was aware of the existence of British cult comic Tank Girl by artist Jamie Hewlett and writer Alan Martin as a pop cultural phenomenon long before I ever picked up this volume, but I had not read any of the material (not even the much later Pete Milligan stuff that I may or may not yet track down and read – we will have to see about that). This black and white (as originally published) volume covers the first "yearish" worth of Tank Girl material, and is the first of a series. These volumes look good, and I guess are recommended to fans of the material, but I am very glad that I only dipped my toes in the water, as it were, and merely picked up the first. Tank Girl as envisioned by Hewlett and Martin is a wild, chaotic, underground comic that often reads as somewhat sophomoric in its revelling of sex, nudity and violence (although in a quite liberating kick-ass female action hero manner, which is not usually what one sees in these types of things). As such, I guess it is not bad, but at the same time it fails to capture my interest, and despite its being a not too hefty volume took me an age, with many, many pauses, to get through. As stated above, I may at some point check out Pete Milligan's stab at writing the character (with Hewlett still on art), as I am a fan of Milligan, and kind of suspect he uses her in a more narrative manner which might appeal to me more. But it will not be something I rush out to buy, nor will I invest in further volumes of the Hewlett and Martin material.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Sweeney

    Until recently when I read this, my only experience of 'Tank Girl' had been the funny but heavily camp movie released in the early 90's featuring a bunch of humanoid Kangaroo's and Malcom McDowell. Yet for some reason whenever I think back to my memories of high school, they're littered with images of the tank girl comic book and how prominantly it featured in my local comic book store where I squandered my youth alongside my best friend. Tank Girl takes place in the post apocalyptic wasteland of Until recently when I read this, my only experience of 'Tank Girl' had been the funny but heavily camp movie released in the early 90's featuring a bunch of humanoid Kangaroo's and Malcom McDowell. Yet for some reason whenever I think back to my memories of high school, they're littered with images of the tank girl comic book and how prominantly it featured in my local comic book store where I squandered my youth alongside my best friend. Tank Girl takes place in the post apocalyptic wasteland of Australia. It tells the story of the titular heroin and follows her crazy antics and exploits. She smokes, she drinks, she has massive amounts of attitude and has regular sex with her mutant Kangaroo boyfriend named Booga. It's hard to really describe this book in much more detail where plot is concerened. Tank Girl is a true product of the 90's in that it's completely insane, constantly breaking the fourth wall and it doesn't really go anywhere. I have the entire collection loaded onto my e-reader but so far I'm really struggling to get past volume 1. I think if I had read this comics as a teenager, when it was originally released, I'd probably have enjoyed it a lot more, but reading it now at the age of 27 I found it really hard to get past the inane wackiness of the writing. The plot was practically non-existent and the artwork, by Jamie Hewlett (which although incredible) seemed hectic and cluttered. Despite this overly negative review; I'm glad I finally got to read it.

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