Hot Best Seller

The Richest Man in Babylon: Audio: The Laws of Financial Success Are the Same Today as They Were Over 6000 Years Ago PDF, ePub eBook

4.6 out of 5
30 review

The Richest Man in Babylon: Audio: The Laws of Financial Success Are the Same Today as They Were Over 6000 Years Ago

Availability: Ready to download

File Name: The Richest Man in Babylon: Audio: The Laws of Financial Success Are the Same Today as They Were Over 6000 Years Ago .pdf

How it works:

1. Register a free 1 month Trial Account.

2. Download as many books as you like (Personal use)

3. Cancel the membership at any time if not satisfied.


The Richest Man in Babylon: Audio: The Laws of Financial Success Are the Same Today as They Were Over 6000 Years Ago PDF, ePub eBook The Richest Man in Babylon provides listeners with the secret to making money. The famous Babylonian Principles, dating back almost 6,000 years, show where the principles of wealth accumulation were founded.

30 review for The Richest Man in Babylon: Audio: The Laws of Financial Success Are the Same Today as They Were Over 6000 Years Ago

  1. 4 out of 5

    William Beesley

    Books like Richest Man in Babylon, Rich Dad Poor Dad, the Millionaire next door will never go away unfortunately. There is too much money to be made in writing them. Richest Man in Babylon combines a simple premise with a mysterious title to drag the reader through 150 pages of drudgery that could be summed up in a couple of sentences: 1. Save 10% of everything you make. 2. Be smart not dumb 3. Invest the money you save. Despite George Clason's (the author) best, somewhat self serving, intentions Books like Richest Man in Babylon, Rich Dad Poor Dad, the Millionaire next door will never go away unfortunately. There is too much money to be made in writing them. Richest Man in Babylon combines a simple premise with a mysterious title to drag the reader through 150 pages of drudgery that could be summed up in a couple of sentences: 1. Save 10% of everything you make. 2. Be smart not dumb 3. Invest the money you save. Despite George Clason's (the author) best, somewhat self serving, intentions America has clever and deeper pocketed interests such as Capital One Master Card, Retailers, Payday Loan Centers, and the Brick and Mortar of the American Economy, Capitalism and Consumerism that are determined in showing us that being broke and having things is better than being the Richest man in Babylon and suffering our old acquaintances showing up at high school reunions in fancier cars than our mid 90's Toyota 4Runner. For those that find Richest Man in Babylon persuasive, putting forward novel concepts that will motivate them to straighten out their finances, I've got bad news. The hounds of consumerism will put out an equally persuasive message which will financially pull in the other direction and it will be back to potentially suffering from Aflatoxin poisoning while eating dry cat food to knock out this month's rent.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    Redundant? Yes. Simplistic? Yes. Necessary? Absolutely. Reading the book changes one's perspective on personal finances.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Madeline Friedman

    Nobody gets rich without working and we know that we should work hard. But what does hard work mean? This book answers it well. I bought this bestseller @50% off here: https://www.amazon.com/Richest-Man-Ba...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lola

    This was an unusual but engaging multi-layered tale about finance, business and human accomplishments that, I admit, could have been less simplistic but that was smart enough to make me think about my own financial situation and offered advice worth considering.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tamsyn

    This book was absolutely fantastic! It really opened my eyes to finances and has changed the way I view them. One of the biggest things this book teaches is that no matter what size your income is, 10% of it is yours to keep. Another is that debt is an enemy to conquer, not a necessary evil. One of the families in the story did this, and had to pay rent on top of it. We have long realized that renting and paying interest on a mortgage is about the same. Michael and I came up with a spending plan This book was absolutely fantastic! It really opened my eyes to finances and has changed the way I view them. One of the biggest things this book teaches is that no matter what size your income is, 10% of it is yours to keep. Another is that debt is an enemy to conquer, not a necessary evil. One of the families in the story did this, and had to pay rent on top of it. We have long realized that renting and paying interest on a mortgage is about the same. Michael and I came up with a spending plan that allots 20% of our income to actually paying off our debt, and we will be completely debt free in 9 years, and in that time we will also have allotted 10% to savings. 10% of our income goes to tithing as well, so this gives us 60% of our income to live off of. But we took that figure and created a plan based on that amount. We're not going to starve on that figure. This plan gives us less money for other things that we're used to buying, and starting out we realize that we're going to have to sacrifice to make this work, but we figure that now while our family is young is the best time to establish these habits. To be completely debt free with our home before we even have teenagers will be a powerful thing. We just need to focus on this master plan. This book was highly motivating for me, and I recommend it to anyone who ever uses money.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael Atkinson

    Read it 4 years ago, LOVED it, I should read it again. Fun to read, interesting, though provoking and but mostly just plain inspiring. If you don't have problems with spending too much money no need to read it. If you have tons of money and it's not a problem no need to read it. If you live on a budget like most of it, enjoy. Deserving of its well-regarded status of one of the classics of personal finance.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Wamsat

    My brother passed me this book many years ago. His instructions were simple: Read it. It'll change your life. I read it. Did it change my life? Yes, in a manner of speaking. There are many of out there who desperately want to learn the basics of handling money. But, pick up the latest drudgery from your local bookstore on the subject, and you'll find yourself wading through terms and calculations that may as well be a foreign language. The Richest Man in Babylon takes a different approach. It puts My brother passed me this book many years ago. His instructions were simple: Read it. It'll change your life. I read it. Did it change my life? Yes, in a manner of speaking. There are many of out there who desperately want to learn the basics of handling money. But, pick up the latest drudgery from your local bookstore on the subject, and you'll find yourself wading through terms and calculations that may as well be a foreign language. The Richest Man in Babylon takes a different approach. It puts the base concepts of your handling money, and puts them in a story format, whose principles are extremely easy to comprehend (at least as compared to the overblown rationale behind the other financial books) for the layman. Due to their simplicity, the concepts are very memorable and consequently easily recalled after 10 years. The last time I read this book was in 2002, and I can still remember the base concepts from the book: 1. Pay yourself first (Save at least 10% of your paycheck) 2. Don't trust a bricklayer to buy jewels (Don't get caught up in other people's excitement. Go see the experts instead) 3. Don't put all of your eggs in a single basket (Diversify your portfolio). 4. Control thy expenses. (Even the richest man has a time constraint on his life. Do what you enjoy, but don't overdo it) 5. Increase your ability to earn (That one is self-explanatory) etc. Keeping these base principle in mind has helped me through these economic hard-times. To me, this book has become required reading for my children and my nephews.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    This is a great starting item for someone who is pressed for time and doesn't want to read a ton of financial books. While some of the ideas are archaically written, they remain timeless. An obvious one: as a person's wealth rises, so do their expenses. Translation, if you want to have money, learn to discipline yourself now and not later. Studies show that most lottery winners are bankrupt within a few years and mostly because they lacked self discipline. Therefore, the problem is not the lack o This is a great starting item for someone who is pressed for time and doesn't want to read a ton of financial books. While some of the ideas are archaically written, they remain timeless. An obvious one: as a person's wealth rises, so do their expenses. Translation, if you want to have money, learn to discipline yourself now and not later. Studies show that most lottery winners are bankrupt within a few years and mostly because they lacked self discipline. Therefore, the problem is not the lack of money but how it is managed. Any accountant worth his salt will tell you that. Keep in mind the story is set in ancient Babylon so if you want something more contemporary, while learning, try RICH DAD, POOR DAD by Robert Kiyosaki.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Lo, Money is Plentiful For Those Who Understand The Simple Rules of its Acquisition $even Cures for a Lean Purse 1. Start thy purse to fattening For every ten coins thou placest within thy purse take out for use but nine 2. Control thy expenditures 3. Make thy gold multiply Not only did my capital increase, but it's earnings likewise increased 4. Guard thy treasures from loss It is wise to be intrigued by larger earnings when thy principal may be lost? I say not 5. Make of thy dwelling a profitable inve Lo, Money is Plentiful For Those Who Understand The Simple Rules of its Acquisition $even Cures for a Lean Purse 1. Start thy purse to fattening For every ten coins thou placest within thy purse take out for use but nine 2. Control thy expenditures 3. Make thy gold multiply Not only did my capital increase, but it's earnings likewise increased 4. Guard thy treasures from loss It is wise to be intrigued by larger earnings when thy principal may be lost? I say not 5. Make of thy dwelling a profitable investment Every man own the roof that sheltereth him and his 6. Insure a future income A man to make preparation for a suitable income in the days to come, when he is no longer young, and to make preparations for his family should he be no longer with them to comfort and support them 7. Increase thy ability to earn Cultivate thy own powers, to study and become wiser, to become more skillful Read the book! it's an excellent financial advisor!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Fox

    "...I made a million,today. What did you do?..." A book review of “The Richest Man in Babylon” by George S. Clason Have you heard about The Richest Man in Babylon, by George S. Clason first published in 1926, it’s a story that maybe you should read? When I first read this story I was just a young boy, but it still fascinates me now. My grandfather had given a copy to me to read, and after I finished reading it, I can remember him asking me what I had learnt. I can also remember what I said in repl "...I made a million,today. What did you do?..." A book review of “The Richest Man in Babylon” by George S. Clason Have you heard about The Richest Man in Babylon, by George S. Clason first published in 1926, it’s a story that maybe you should read? When I first read this story I was just a young boy, but it still fascinates me now. My grandfather had given a copy to me to read, and after I finished reading it, I can remember him asking me what I had learnt. I can also remember what I said in reply. I explained to my granddad that I understood the wisdom of saving and how Armad the richest man in Babylon acquired his wealth that had spent much of his time teaching others how to become wiser, and I guess wealthier? You might consider that Arkad was lucky in his life that he was able to accumulate such wealth, but you would be wrong in your thinking. He had a simple philosophy save ten per cent of what you earn and invest, and this is what he did. Every day he taught to the crowd who would gather to listen that his fortune didn’t depend on lady luck, but on wise investment of one’s earnings. Those bankers which lost billions for their banks recently and had to be bailed out by governments around the world they should read the story about Arkad, but I guess they would be too busy spending their bonuses. I find it difficult to multi-task as well. Even computers cannot multi-task it just appears so. I wrote an article some moons ago called “Adding Alpha - Do computers have the alpha edge” that discussed how investment banks and institutions in today’s cyber space currently rely heavily on ‘algo trading’ to make money trading in stocks, shares, commodities, currencies. Algo trading is a term used to describe the algorithmic software which is used to gain that alpha edge against an increasing frenetic trading market where milliseconds can mean millions in buy and sell decisions in veiled trading markets. In a previous life, a trader said to me “… I made a million, today. What did you do?” I replied, “I’ve fixed the computer.” Anyhow, my grandfather said you need to read it again, because you have missed the most important point. This is what I did. Essentially, it’s easy to miss the opportunities that come our way which is the moral of the story. There’s a Jewish proverb that says, “You don’t need intelligence to have luck, but you do need luck to have intelligence.” It wasn’t until I understood the importance of critical thinking that I really appreciated the truth in this book. When we make assumptions, we often make the wrong ones. I hope you enjoy it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Richest Man in Babylon is a fantastic book to change your wealth paradigm. Originally published in 1926 as a series of booklets, the chapters are a little disjointed, but well worth the read. Clason espouses some very simple wealth building principles. First, save 10% for yourself. Secondly, invest 10% with the advice of knowledgeable and prudent advisers. Finally, he recommends using 20% of your income monthly as payments to get out of any debt you may have. Clason recommends distributing t The Richest Man in Babylon is a fantastic book to change your wealth paradigm. Originally published in 1926 as a series of booklets, the chapters are a little disjointed, but well worth the read. Clason espouses some very simple wealth building principles. First, save 10% for yourself. Secondly, invest 10% with the advice of knowledgeable and prudent advisers. Finally, he recommends using 20% of your income monthly as payments to get out of any debt you may have. Clason recommends distributing this debt payoff amount evenly between all outstanding debts, thus paying them simultaneously. The remaining 60% can be used for living expenses. He encourages thrift and fortitude to lift oneself to wealth and warns against gaining wealth quickly. This book is applicable today when so much of the nation is in debt and living from one paycheck to the next. Many delightfully told stories of lifting oneself from poverty and dishonor to hard-won wealth sympathize with our situation and encourage diligent effort. One piece is missing: the tithe. A 10% donation to God will certainly yield greater benefit than any investment. Also, after debt payoff, increasing donations and/or investments and continuing to live on 60% of your income would be a good idea.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sonja Arlow

    I have always found books on personal finance exceptionally boring and have avoided reading them because of this. This book however takes the form of stories from Babylonian citizens each touching on an aspect of personal finance (save 10% of your earnings, don’t rent but rather own property and invest your money wisely so it may grow etc etc) None of this is new to me however sometimes you need a reminder to jolt you out of bad financial habits. I can highly recommend this and will be buying it a I have always found books on personal finance exceptionally boring and have avoided reading them because of this. This book however takes the form of stories from Babylonian citizens each touching on an aspect of personal finance (save 10% of your earnings, don’t rent but rather own property and invest your money wisely so it may grow etc etc) None of this is new to me however sometimes you need a reminder to jolt you out of bad financial habits. I can highly recommend this and will be buying it as a Christmas present for a few people this year. Thanks for the recommendation Linda

  13. 4 out of 5

    Aronkai

    Clason’s (22-42) "Seven Cures for a Lean Purse" chapter gives you a good overview of the book. The seven principles mentioned are the following: 1. Start thy purse to fattening 2. Control thy expenditures 3. Make thy gold multiply 4. Guard thy treasures from loss 5. Make of thy dwelling a profitable investment 6. Insure a future income 7. Increase thy ability to earn Average American spends $ 1.22 for every dollar they make (Parker). For all the indebted people Clason (108) writes that you should save Clason’s (22-42) "Seven Cures for a Lean Purse" chapter gives you a good overview of the book. The seven principles mentioned are the following: 1. Start thy purse to fattening 2. Control thy expenditures 3. Make thy gold multiply 4. Guard thy treasures from loss 5. Make of thy dwelling a profitable investment 6. Insure a future income 7. Increase thy ability to earn Average American spends $ 1.22 for every dollar they make (Parker). For all the indebted people Clason (108) writes that you should save 10 %, pay 20 % to your debtors, and live with the 70 %.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bam

    #book-vipers-book-hunter: MAN George S. Clason published a series of pamphlets beginning in 1926 with financial advice couched in Babylonian parables, which were later combined in book form and given the title, The Richest Man in Babylon. Very basic advice and somewhat dated and repetitious, but I can't help thinking that these 'rules' he put forth should be taught in schools as good advice for beginner's handling money. Our financial advisor gave us two copies of this slim book for our daughters #book-vipers-book-hunter: MAN George S. Clason published a series of pamphlets beginning in 1926 with financial advice couched in Babylonian parables, which were later combined in book form and given the title, The Richest Man in Babylon. Very basic advice and somewhat dated and repetitious, but I can't help thinking that these 'rules' he put forth should be taught in schools as good advice for beginner's handling money. Our financial advisor gave us two copies of this slim book for our daughters and their husbands and I slipped them into their Christmas stockings this past year. One read it and is following the advice closely, crediting it for their improved financial situation, while the other hasn't yet bothered to read it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    This book teaches timeless financial wisdom in the form of fictitious parables set in ancient Babylon. I found the stories entertaining and the financial lessons as valid today as they were in Babylon millennia ago. There’s nothing groundbreaking here, but that doesn’t lessen the value of the simple financial basics: pay yourself first (at least 10%), live on less than you earn, get advice from financially competent people, and put your money to work through cautious investing. The book recommends This book teaches timeless financial wisdom in the form of fictitious parables set in ancient Babylon. I found the stories entertaining and the financial lessons as valid today as they were in Babylon millennia ago. There’s nothing groundbreaking here, but that doesn’t lessen the value of the simple financial basics: pay yourself first (at least 10%), live on less than you earn, get advice from financially competent people, and put your money to work through cautious investing. The book recommends enjoying life, and not working so hard to amass wealth that you become miserly. It says that to succeed, you must have strong, definite desires and ambitions, not vague dreams. The story of the goddess of good luck teaches that you must always be prepared for opportunity, because luck rewards men of action. I first heard about this book on the Open for Business podcast. When an investment manager recommended it too, I decided to read it. I'm glad I did! My favorite chapter was Seven Cures for a Lean Purse. Here are the lessons: • Start thy purse to fattening: save 10% of all you earn • Control thy expenditures: budget 90% of earnings to cover necessities and luxuries • Make thy gold multiply: put money to work by investing • Guard thy treasure from loss: seek financial advice and make wise investments • Make of thy dwelling a profitable investment: own your home to decrease living costs and increase enjoyment (compared to renting) • Ensure a future income: plan for the future financial well-being of yourself and family • Increase thy ability to earn: increase your skills through study and practice

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gabriela

    It teaches the values of saving, overcoming poor habits such as procrastination & being able to take advantage of opportunities The Richest Man In Babylon by George Clason was originally written in 1926. Through the narratives of Bansir, and his broke musician friend, we can see the standard folk who try to figure out how to get out of debt, the salary slavery and to finally attain wealth. Clason also uses the narrative of the richest man in Babylon Arkad who was initially poor but later lear It teaches the values of saving, overcoming poor habits such as procrastination & being able to take advantage of opportunities The Richest Man In Babylon by George Clason was originally written in 1926. Through the narratives of Bansir, and his broke musician friend, we can see the standard folk who try to figure out how to get out of debt, the salary slavery and to finally attain wealth. Clason also uses the narrative of the richest man in Babylon Arkad who was initially poor but later learnt how to accumulate wealth. Through Arkad, the rest of Babylon gets to understand the secrets of wealth accumulation. Clason's book is a timeless classic and most of its message still holds true today. It teaches the values of saving, overcoming poor habits such as procrastination and being able to take advantage of opportunities. It is amazing how he was able to vividly elucidate the Babylonian lifestyle, as if he were there in that society. However, importantly, he was able to bring out these timeless values that anyone can apply today and in years to come. It is interesting that the ancient idea of compounding is what we today see as saving or making an investment. I highly recommend this simple book to anyone who may be looking for inspiration on how to accumulate wealth. Nevertheless, the idea here is to put what you learn into practice to see any results.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Izwan Zakaria

    This tiny book is a classic. It is a classic because it tells you a classic story about the most important thing anybody should know about finance ie The Golden Rule of Saving. The language is biblical yet so easy to understand. Excellent read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Arash Narchi

    Horribly written and hard to follow. Maybe would have been a good read in 1927.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mariam

    A great little book I've read umpteen times. It reads beautifully and is packed with wisdom, truth, great knowledge, and profound insights.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Parth Agrawal

    "If determination is there, ways can be found" This classic poetic map, helping us to discover and reap the treasure of finances, teaches through tales one can only imagine to be too idealistic to be true at the face of it. Cardinal rules, conjured even before the birth of Christ, will take you through the world of trade, money and gold in ever so entertaining ways beyond one's wildest imaginations. The rules have stood the test of time as it has been documented at the end of the book that how the "If determination is there, ways can be found" This classic poetic map, helping us to discover and reap the treasure of finances, teaches through tales one can only imagine to be too idealistic to be true at the face of it. Cardinal rules, conjured even before the birth of Christ, will take you through the world of trade, money and gold in ever so entertaining ways beyond one's wildest imaginations. The rules have stood the test of time as it has been documented at the end of the book that how the archaeologists who found the clay tablets upon which these rules were documented practiced these rules and were able to gain control of their finances in ways incomprehensible to them before. They used these ways and were surprised to see the results as they simultaneously built on their corpus, returned back their loans with due diligence and also comfortably carried on with their daily needs being met periodically without a hitch. Now the burning question- What the hell are these rules which even after 8000 years hold ground? Well there are umpteen of them in the book but some of them one must be exposed to so as to feel the golden rub off:p so here comes:- 1) You should always pay yourself no less than one tenth of whatever you earn. I know some of you might be feeling disappointed but that's true guys. Life is simple and coming to simple conclusions only will bring in sense to your life. The first question that I had in my mind after reading this was that if I'm getting the whole income, what is the meaning of paying one tenth of whatever I earn to myself? Well to clear the smoke on that, your expenses on things such as rent, food, objects etc don't count as a payment to yourself because they go as they come. These things should be accounting to 70% of your salary. There is an assumption here that everyone must be having some or the other obligations to fulfill so 20% should be kept for that whereas the last 10% should be kept only for you. 2) Control thy expenditures. There is a big difference between your burning desires and fleeting wishes that keep you enslaved on a daily basis. These are the very vicious wishes that leads one's boat to the rocks of loss and remorse. This is a very difficult part as differentiating between the two is the first step towards controlling your expenditures. One way to evaluate between the two is to imagine whatever you wish for and ask yourself how would your life be affected if this wish is not fulfilled and if the answer is 'nothing much' then it is not worth pursuing. 3) Multiply thy gold. If your money doesn't earn money for you then it is speaking to you in a language you don't understand. Consider money as your employee which will give birth to kids which will further work to produce more kids unless you have a big army such that in-Toto they become river of gold for the rest of your life. Money kept idle is a wasted ammunition and as we all know idle money looses its value faster than we know. Fickle Fate, as many people claim, is the name of the game in earning money but whosoever has fallen into the clutches of this goddess has seldom lived to tell the story. Opportunity my friends is a gorgeous goddess who pays visit to all but the problem is she is impatient and doesn't like to waste her time for those who are unprepared. The time has come to ask oneself- "Do we have the soul of a slave or of a free-man?" at the end of the day we are nothing but the choices that we have made:)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    OK, I didn't even finish the book because I've heard it all before. Besides, here it's told in a story which is nice if you need to know about how to acquire money, keep it, and make your money earn more money, especially if this is your first book on the topic, find the topic boring, and need a story to entertain to get it across. This is just one of thousands of books that speaks on this material. I found it rather repetitive and corny in its story form. Other books you might be interested in OK, I didn't even finish the book because I've heard it all before. Besides, here it's told in a story which is nice if you need to know about how to acquire money, keep it, and make your money earn more money, especially if this is your first book on the topic, find the topic boring, and need a story to entertain to get it across. This is just one of thousands of books that speaks on this material. I found it rather repetitive and corny in its story form. Other books you might be interested in that are more fact based and driven are Secrets to Creating Wealth: Learn How to Create Outrageous Wealth with Only Two Pennies to Rub Together; Think and Grow Rich; The Science of Getting Rich, How to Get What You Want; Secrets of the Millionaire Mind; on and on. Like I said, there have been thousands of books written on the topic. Why this one is so popular, not sure. It has been around a long time, first published in 1926 and re-printed a dozen times; it's a very short, easy read, and, like I said, it's in story form. So maybe all that adds to it, but I'd rather just have the facts. I don't need story. When things are written like this and I'm looking for information, I have a tendency to skip around a lot. Or, like in this case, just drop it after a few dozen pages because I've heard this stuff many times before. If you don't know much about the topic, I say give it a read through. But be warned, it is not the end all and cure all on such a complex topic. To understand any topic of complexity you have to read many books, for there is author bias, blind spots (few of us know it all), and complexity. Few books can cover all angles well. But to give you an idea about what this book covers, here it is: 1) Start thy purse to fattening - save/invest 2) Control thy expenditures - watch out for self serving brokers 3) Make thy gold mutiply - use powerful investments 4) Guard thy treasures from loss - watch out for brokers with their hot tips. 5) Make of thy dwelling a profitable investment - rental properties, your own home---but stay within your means. 6) Insure a future income - do work that you love to do. Become excellent at it. 7) Increase thy ability to earn - education never stops. Keep reading good books like this one, The Millionaire Next Door, Rich Dad Poor Dad and so on. But anyone who has made money will tell you, there's much more to it than just what is stated here. Also much depends on the individual: talents, gifts, upbringing, mental maturity and stability, focus, ability to deal with and prosper from failure, motivation, on and on. Many have read books, gone to seminars, listened to CDs, watched DVDs, got it all, got it all down pat but never do anything with it. If it was that easy to make money and get rich, most would be doing it. There is a LOT that is not covered here. Another point to consider that there are as many ways to gain riches as there are people to gain them. YOU have your road map to riches and wealth within you; it is a very individual based path. But when all is said and done, if you just focus on money, you've missed the point all together. Peace!

  22. 5 out of 5

    RC1140

    Meh , that is the best way to describe this book. This may be due to the fact that everything that was disucssed is fairly common knowledge and most people practice these concepts or know to practice these concepts. They may not have been common at the time, but doent explain how this book has such a high rating. The concepts being wrapped in a 'theme' of sorts just made it harder to follow along at times since the style or writing is quite old. The age of this book shows it self even more by th Meh , that is the best way to describe this book. This may be due to the fact that everything that was disucssed is fairly common knowledge and most people practice these concepts or know to practice these concepts. They may not have been common at the time, but doent explain how this book has such a high rating. The concepts being wrapped in a 'theme' of sorts just made it harder to follow along at times since the style or writing is quite old. The age of this book shows it self even more by the fact that it doesnt address any of the issues that people face in our current age (an example of this is rampant consumerism and excesive use of interest based finance).

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amir Tesla

    A very sound book leaving you with a feeling that resembles having a genuine touch on the ancient wisdom. There are several principles being suggested on the book regarding a wealthy path wrapped in story telling of wise men of that time. Another interesting thing for me as someone who's native tongue is not english was an old form of the English that was being used long long ago. I really enjoyed the book and would recommend to anyone who is determined to form her/his thoughts around shooting for A very sound book leaving you with a feeling that resembles having a genuine touch on the ancient wisdom. There are several principles being suggested on the book regarding a wealthy path wrapped in story telling of wise men of that time. Another interesting thing for me as someone who's native tongue is not english was an old form of the English that was being used long long ago. I really enjoyed the book and would recommend to anyone who is determined to form her/his thoughts around shooting for the moon.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Begüm Saçak

    A great, brief book on how to manage personal finances and lead a financially stable life. The story of Babylonians and how they managed to master their financial skills make this book relevant to today's world. The recommendations are given in such a way that anyone from any financial background can apply them easily. Useful book! I wish I had read it when I was younger.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    Written in 1926 yet still very relevant today. Provides good life lesson .

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Yael Winston

    This is a short one, but it offers familiar yet indispensable tips on money management. Told in the clunky language of fables, Clason tells 10 tales of men in ancient Babylon and the secrets they (and the city itself) used to acquire great wealth in the ancient world. Some tales and tips are redundant (which also serves to show how little mankind changes over the millenia), so the following are highlights: "Seven Cures for a Lean Purse," my favorite tale, told by Arkad, the Richest Man in Babylon This is a short one, but it offers familiar yet indispensable tips on money management. Told in the clunky language of fables, Clason tells 10 tales of men in ancient Babylon and the secrets they (and the city itself) used to acquire great wealth in the ancient world. Some tales and tips are redundant (which also serves to show how little mankind changes over the millenia), so the following are highlights: "Seven Cures for a Lean Purse," my favorite tale, told by Arkad, the Richest Man in Babylon: 1. Start thy purse to fattening: In this and other tales, this first tip, saving, takes a prominent place. "For every ten coins thou placest within thy purse take out for use but nine. Thy purse will start to fatten at once and its increasing weight will feel good in thy hand and bring satisfaction to thy soul"(27). Arkad says the same thing in other tales, as do other speakers in the book. A variation: "A part of all you earn is yours to keep"(21). I especially like that Clason, through Arkad, points out that paying oneself first (as I've heard modern financial writes put it) brings "satisfaction to thy soul." Saving, like giving, is more character-building than it is financial. The sense of looking after oneself and one's family, if applicable, gives a person the strength to keep pushing to pay off debt, increase financial security, and work hard to accomplish both. 2. Control thy expenditures: "That what each of us calls our 'necessary expenses' will always grow to equal our incomes unless we protest to the contrary"(29). It's good to know that the truism "I'll never make enough money" was likely as true in ancient Babylon as it is today. The trick is not to develop an attitude of entitlement over the things one cannot afford--and then spend money one does not have. "Budget then thy necessary expenses. Touch not the one-tenth that is fattening thy purse. Let this be thy great desire that is being fulfilled. Keep working with thy budget, keep adjusting it to help thee. Make it thy first assistant in defending thy fattening purse"(30). I LIKE that perspective on a budget, as an ASSISTANT to achieving great wealth. 3. Make thy gold multiply: Put one's money to work through investments. Think of the old cliche "when you're poor, you work for your money; when you're rich, your money works for you." 4. Guard thy treasures from loss: When investing, make sure to guard the principal and collect a fair return on investment. Consult with those knowledgeable in investing to find such investments. 5. Make of thy dwelling a profitable investment. In other words, own one's own home. Not only do properties usually increase in value, this cure, too, offers more psychological benefit than financial--owning one's own home allows one to have a stable place to rear a family and a peaceful place to take respite before continuing one's work of building wealth. 6. Insure a future income: "Therefore do I say that it behooves a man to make preparation for a suitable income in the days to come, when he is no longer young, and to make preparations for his family should he be no longer with them to comfort and support them"(37). Save for retirement. Buy life insurance if one has dependents. 7. Increase thy ability to earn: "Cultivate thy own powers, to study and become wiser, to become more skillful, to so act as to respect thyself. Thereby shalt thou acquire confidence in thyself to achieve thy carefully considered desires"(42). Another healthy way to look at making money. Increasing one's earning potential by KNOWING MORE of one's craft not only increases earning potential, it increases self-respect. Other tales that jumped out at me: In "Meet the Goddess of Good Luck" (43-58), procrastination comes under attack. Procrastination is as much of an enemy in one's finances as it is in all other areas of life. "The spirit of procrastination is within all men. We desire riches; yet, how often when opportunity doth appear before us, that spirit of procrastination from within doth urge various delays in our acceptance. In listening to it we do become our own worst enemies"(55). That's a good phrase to remember: Procrastination makes us our own worst enemies!!! The other side of the coin is that those who take action (the non-procrastinators) curry the favor of the goddess of good luck. In "The Gold Lender of Babylon" (74-88), a spearmaker who has just received a large sum of money for his work for the king goes to a prominent money lender to ask his advice as to whether or not the spearmaker should lend this sum to his brother-in-law. The money lender helps the spearmaker determine what sorts of investments are sound and which are unwise. The financial need of a friend or family member may cause one to feel pity for that person, but that does not mean a loan or an investment is a wise choice to help that person out. "If you desire to help thy friend, do so in a way that will not bring thy friend's burden upon thyself"(78). Id est, don't co-sign on a loan. As if that didn't hit close enough to home, add to that the statement, "Humans in the throes of great emotions are not safe risks for the gold lender"(80). Lending to those in desperate straits is rarely a good idea, as one must consider the behavior that got them there and/or could keep them there. Seeking advice on sound investments and putting one's money only in those investments guards against loss of wealth and regret. "The Luckiest Man in Babylon" (118-137) lauds the virtues of work. "Some men hate [work]. They make it their enemy. Better to treat it like a friend, make thyself like it. Don't mind because it is hard. If thou thinkest about what a good house thou build, then who cares if the beams are heavy and it is far from the well to carry the water for the plaster.... Remember, work, well-done, does good to the man who does it. It makes him a better man"(125-126). Again, finances cannot be divorced from character and well-being. Working, saving, making wise investments, controlling spending, and not procrastinating build wealth, and more importantly, each one also builds character. I would have liked to see the book also address charitable giving. That, too, is an important financial and character-building step. Overall, a good read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    An older friend recommended this book to me in 2004. I finally got around to reading it. I'm glad I did. It's a quick, although sometimes quirky, read. It helps to realize that the book was really a collection of pamphlets distributed in the 1920's by banks and insurance companies. This explains a little bit of its bias, but I think the advice is still sound. The book is set in ancient Babylon that begins with Bansir, a chariot maker, commiserating with his broke friend (a lyre player). They can't An older friend recommended this book to me in 2004. I finally got around to reading it. I'm glad I did. It's a quick, although sometimes quirky, read. It helps to realize that the book was really a collection of pamphlets distributed in the 1920's by banks and insurance companies. This explains a little bit of its bias, but I think the advice is still sound. The book is set in ancient Babylon that begins with Bansir, a chariot maker, commiserating with his broke friend (a lyre player). They can't figure out how to get out of their living essentially paycheck to paycheck. The story follows him as he finds a wealthy person who shares his secrets with the him and the rest of the city. The book has some timeless advice: always save at least 10% of your paycheck, have your savings earn good interest, pay your debts, etc. Wikipedia has a fantastic overview of the book (including the Seven Cures for a Lean Purse and the Five Laws of Gold): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rich... Here are some of the other things that I highlighted in addition to what Wikipedia mentioned: * "Thou makest me to realize the reason why we have never found any measure of wealth. We never sought it."* "A PART OF ALL YOU EARN IS YOURS TO KEEP. It should not be less than a tenth no matter how little you earn. It can be as much more as you can afford. Pay yourself first." * "Advice is one thing that is freely given away, but watch that you take only what is worth having. He who takes advice about his savings from one who is inexperienced in such matters, shall pay with his savings for proving the falsity of their opinions." * "When I set a task for myself, I complete it. Therefore, I am careful not to start difficult and impractical tasks, because I love leisure." * "If a rich man builds him a new palace, is the gold he pays out gone? No, the brick maker has part of it and the laborer has part of it, and the artist has part of it. And everyone who labors upon the house has part of it. Yet when the palace is completed, is it not worth all it cost? And is the ground upon which it stands not worth more because it is there? And is the ground that adjoins it not worth more because it is there? Wealth grows in magic ways. No man can prophesy the limit of it." * "Then learn to make your treasure work for you. Make it your slave. Make its children and its children's children work for you." * "Seek the advice of men whose daily work is handling money." * "A small return and a safe one is far more desirable than risk." * "Enjoy life while you are here. Do not overstrain or try to save too much. If one tenth of all you earn is as much as you can comfortably keep, be content to keep this portion." * "He must pay his debts with all promptness within his power, not purchasing that for which he is unable to pay." * "He must make a will of record that in case God calls him, proper and honorable division of his property be accomplished." * "He must have compassion upon those who are injured or smitten by misfortune and aid them within reasonable limits. He must do deeds of thoughtfulness to those dear to him." * "In this tale we see how good luck waits to come to that man who accepts opportunity." (don't be Procrastinator)... "wisdom of making a payment immediately when we are convinced our bargain is wise." "Good luck can be enticed by accepting opportunity. "ACTION will lead thee forward to the successes thou dost desire. "Men of Action are favored by Good Luck." * "To take his first start to building an estate is as good luck as can come to any man. With all men, that first step, which changes them from men who earn from their own labor to men who draw dividends from the earnings of their gold, is important." * "Wealth that comes quickly goeth the same way." * "If thou desire to help thy friend, do so in a way that will not bring thy friend's burdens upon thyself." * "humans in the throws of great emotions are not safe risks for the gold lender." * "Many other merchants of Babylon have my confidence because of their honorable behavior. Their tokens come and go frequently in my token box. Good merchants are an asset to our city and it profits me to aid them to keep trade moving that Babylon be prosperous." * "I will no longer lend any of it where I am not confident that it is safe and will be returned to me. Neither will I lend it where I am not convinced that its earnings will be promptly paid to me." * "Be conservative in what thou expect it to earn that thou mayest keep and enjoy thy treasure. To hire it out with a promise of usurious returns is to invite loss." * "Better a Little Caution than a Great Regret" * "We cannot afford to be without adequate protection." * "Ill fortune! Wouldst blame God for thine own weakness. Ill fortune pursues every man who thinks more of borrowing than of repaying." * "no man can respect himself who does not repay honest debts." * "Where the Determination is, the Way Can Be Found" * "Therefore am I more determined than ever to carry through, being convinced that it is easier to pay one's just debts than to avoid them." * "Great is the PLAN for it leadeth us out of debt and giveth us wealth which is ours to keep." * "Babylon is an outstanding example of man's ability to achieve great objectives, using whatever means are at his disposal. All of the resources supporting this large city were man developed. All of its riches were man made." All told, a nice book that reminds us of timeless truths.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shahad Alkhazraji

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Light book and good advice's for someone straggling with bills .

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jason Donoghue

    There is some great advice in this book. It should be read in schools, took me years to figure out the secret in this book by myself

  30. 5 out of 5

    PlatKat

    When people want to learn how to make money, they read huge finance books, watch MSNBC, buy in to phony get-rich-quick schemes, or get business degrees. But the average person need not look further than this simple book. My father lent me his copy, probably to ensure that I would continue my post-college streak of never asking him for money (or big-ticket items, which is the same as asking for money) EVAR. Lucky for both of us, the principles laid out in this book are common sense to me. I don't When people want to learn how to make money, they read huge finance books, watch MSNBC, buy in to phony get-rich-quick schemes, or get business degrees. But the average person need not look further than this simple book. My father lent me his copy, probably to ensure that I would continue my post-college streak of never asking him for money (or big-ticket items, which is the same as asking for money) EVAR. Lucky for both of us, the principles laid out in this book are common sense to me. I don't mean to sound all high and mighty, but living in a country that's up to its ears in debt, it looks like more than a few people could stand to read this. Although it's hard to get on board with the dowdy language (it was written in the 30s), the anecdotes throughout the book prove to be interesting, useful, and even though they describe life in ancient Babylon, quite relatable. Even if you've never found yourself in one of the book's situations, it can still serve as a good reminder to save for a rainy day, honor your debts, and consider your purchases carefully. The book is less than 150 pages--you could read it in an evening. I recommend it!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.